From the Pages of Vine Line: Jed Hoyer Q&A, Part III

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(Photo by Stephen Green)

You don’t have to tell General Manager Jed Hoyer how difficult the Cubs’ 2013 season was. He was there for every pitch, hit and out. And no one in the organization—from the groundskeepers to the players to the men in charge—is happy with 96 losses.

But the GM also knows the organization has made a great deal of progress since he took the helm. The plan was clear from the get-go: Hire the best player development team in the business, stockpile as much high-ceiling talent as possible as quickly as possible, and develop a young, talented team that has the ability to compete year in and year out.

For the November issue, Vine Line caught up with the head man to discuss the 2013 season, improvements in the organization, changes within the club and what to look forward to in 2014. This is the final installment of a three-part conversation we had with the Cubs GM. For the entire conversation or more Cubs information, be sure to check out the November issue of Vine Line.

Jed Hoyer Q&A, Part I
Jed Hoyer Q&A, Part II

VL: You mentioned some of the young guys who are putting up good offensive numbers in the minor leagues. Javier Baez hit 37 home runs this year. Kris Bryant hit 31 home runs in college and continued to hit in the minor leagues. How difficult is it for you to be patient with those guys, especially when you need help at the major league level?

JH: There’s no question it’s fun to look at our minor league box scores now, and it’s great that those guys are performing. But they’re not finished products, and they need to keep developing. I always think the easiest way to remain patient is to look at the careers of other really good players and realize that being rushed, giving up all those developmental minor league at-bats [can be harmful]. You have to learn how to hit in professional baseball. You have to learn how to pitch in professional baseball. Rushing a guy through, at some point, the lack of development is going to catch up with him. We want to teach these guys how to play the right way in the minor leagues, so when they come up here, they’re as ready as possible.

VL: High-A Daytona and Double-A Tennessee had good postseason runs. You moved both Bryant and Dan Vogelbach up to High-A to get them some playoff action. How important is it for young players to experience high-pressure baseball and to learn to win together at the lower levels?

JH: That’s the biggest focus and what you really want. We were going to send [Albert] Almora there also before he got hurt. You want them to have that experience of bonding together, playing in a playoff environment when every run is really important, every defensive play is really important. Playoff baseball is so much more focused than the games over the course of the whole season. When a player can experience playoff baseball, I think it helps them not only in future playoff games, but also in how they prepare for regular season games in the future. I think it’s really important, and hopefully we’ll have some really good minor league teams in the next couple of years so more players can get that experience.

VL: During the two years you’ve been here, the Cubs have gone from being ranked as one of the weaker minor league systems to one of the top three, according to most experts. How difficult is it to turn a system around quickly given some of the restrictions imposed by the new collective bargaining agreement?

JH: It’s certainly more challenging than it had been. There was no question what our playbook was going to be coming in here. We were going to do exactly what we did in Boston and what I was doing in San Diego, which is really emphasizing spending on scouting and player development. You try to spend as much money on young players as possible. There’s so much more impact to your dollars when you’re spending them at that level, because if you’re successful with those players, they can give you exponential value. There was no doubt we were planning to do that, and obviously the CBA restricts us. So as I said before, within the rules that have been given to us, we’ve been as aggressive as possible, and we’ll continue to be.

VL: After losing clubhouse leaders like Alfonso Soriano and David DeJesus, do you worry that there will be a leadership void in the clubhouse, or do you feel like you have guys ready to step up and assume that role?

JH: It’s something that we’re focused on. We need to add some guys who can help teach our young players the right way to do things. No coach can do what a player can do. Player-to-player teaching, player-to-player coaching is so valuable. When you have really good veteran players who can take these guys under their wing and show these guys what they’ve done—as hard as coaches work, it’s difficult for them to have that same sort of relationship. So we know we have to add some leadership to the clubhouse, and certainly that will be a priority.

VL: If you could get one message out to the fans about where this organization is going or what to expect in the coming seasons, what would it be?

JH: From where I sit, I think we’re about to enter an incredibly exciting time for the Cubs. We have a new Spring Training home this year. We’re going to have a renovated Wrigley. The fans who follow us closely can see how much young talent we’ve added and how much we’ll continue to add. I think all of those things are going to come together at roughly the same time, and when they do come together—when that baseball plan and that business plan come together at the same time—I think we have a chance to stay on top and be a really competitive team that has a chance to go to the playoffs every year for quite a while.

That’s something Cubs fans haven’t had in a really long time is a young, talented team that is competitive every year. That’s what we’re trying to build. We feel really good about where we’re going. We’ve asked for a lot of patience. We’ll probably still ask for some more. But I think everything is going to come together really nicely at the same time, and when it does, it’s not going to be a one-year type situation where you’re putting all your eggs in one basket. I think it’s going to be the kind of thing where we can have that sustained success that everyone is looking for.

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