From the Pages of Vine Line: Ron Coomer makes his Chicago return

Coomer

New radio analyst Ron Coomer spent the 2001 season with the Cubs. (Photo by Stephen Green)

The following can be found in the February issue of Vine Line.

Who says you can never go home again?

After nine years working for the Twins—the team with which he made his major league debut in 1995 and spent the bulk of his professional playing career—Ron Coomer will join play-by-play man Pat Hughes in the Cubs broadcast booth for WGN Radio. He replaces Keith Moreland, who left after three years with the club to be closer to his family in Texas.

The affable 47-year-old, affectionately known as “Coom Dawg,” most recently worked on the Twins’ pre- and postgame shows for Fox Sports North and often filled in for Bert Blyleven during game broadcasts. He also hosted a music show on KTWN, the radio station that began airing Twins games in 2013.

For all intents and purposes, Coomer and his family were extremely happy in the North Star State, and they weren’t looking to make a move. But when your dream job comes open, it’s hard to pass up the opportunity.

And Coomer has been waiting for the chance to broadcast Cubs games since he hung on Jack Brickhouse’s every word as a child growing up on Chicago’s West and South sides. Throughout his career as a player and broadcaster, he has always been eager to get back to his hometown.

The Lockport (Ill.) Township High School graduate spent nine years as a major league player and was named to the 1999 American League All-Star team as a member of the Twins. When he reached free agency for the first time after six years in Minnesota, he signed with the Cubs in a matter of days. He spent only one year on the North Side before moving on to the Dodgers and Yankees, but he returned to establish the On Deck Baseball Academy in Orland Park following his playing career.

Once Moreland announced he was leaving, Coomer received a call from Hughes asking if he’d be interested in the job. That kicked off a series of interviews with WGN and the Cubs front office that culminated in his hiring on Dec. 13. We spoke to Coomer just after he joined the Cubs radio team, and needless to say, he’s very happy to be coming home.

Vine Line: You went to high school on Chicago’s South Side. How did you end up a Cubs fan?

Ron Coomer: I actually grew up right by Midway Airport. I was two blocks from Midway on that southwest side of the city. I grew up a Cubs fan for one simple reason: When you ran home after school, the Cubs game was always on in the daytime, and you could catch the last four innings of the game with Jack Brickhouse or whoever was broadcasting.

I couldn’t get the White Sox games on our TV when I was a little guy. So that started me being a Cubs fan as a real little kid. Once I started doing that, then my dad would take me to Wrigley Field on a regular basis, and I just fell in love with going to Wrigley and watching the ballgames. I never really went to Comiskey Park back in the day. I always went to Wrigley. I wasn’t real popular with my grandparents and some of the people in my family, but it’s worked out pretty good so far.

VL: You’d been with the Twins for a long time. What made you want to chase the Cubs job?

RC: I had a very good situation in Minnesota. I do 100 broadcasts for Fox with Twins baseball. I have a music radio show here in town on the Twins Network that we do on drive time every afternoon from 3-7. I really enjoyed my time here. This has been home for a long time now. But I’ve always wanted to do games. Every player, when you get into the broadcast booth, you want to be a part of the game broadcast.

When the Cubs job came available, I didn’t know if I would be thought of at all, but I got a call from Pat Hughes asking me if I was interested. Probably the only place I would go to leave Minnesota would be the Chicago Cubs. My situation with family and everything [in Minnesota] is phenomenal. But it’s the Cubs job. It’s been a dream of mine since before I knew I could hit a baseball.

VL: In baseball, you seldom get to choose the city in which you play or work. What’s it like for you to get a chance to come home to Chicago?

RC: It’s incredible. I can’t even describe it. As a player, I became a free agent, and by 9 a.m. the first morning, [former General Manager] Andy MacPhail had a contract couriered over to my house. So at 9 o’clock in the morning, Day One of free agency, I had a great deal from Andy. Two or three days later, I was a Cub. I started fielding some calls from other teams, and I’m like, “Don’t even bother. We’re already done.” And they’re like, “But free agency just started.” I go, “Nah, not for me it didn’t. It’s over.” So that took all of three days. When this job became available, [it’s a] lifelong dream. To be in Major League Baseball doing this—as crazy as the baseball life is—you couldn’t ask for anything more.

VL: What’s your relationship like with your new partner, Pat Hughes?

RC: Pat’s just one of the nicest people in the world. I’ve always made a point when I come to the ballpark or I’m going to a game at Wrigley to see Pat and whoever was broadcasting, because they’re such good people. So you want to say “hi” and kind of renew your friendship, even if it’s just for that day. It’s been that kind of relationship for a long time with Pat, where you really respect what he does and how he does it and the kind of person he is. So I’ve always made a point to try and see him, and we’ve been friends for a long time. Now we’re going to be partners.

VL: Can you describe your style in the booth?

RC: I’m kind of analytical when it comes to understanding the little nuances of the game, whether it’s your swing as a hitter or what certain things are happening with a pitcher. I basically talk about the pitcher from the hitter’s perspective. So fans will get an idea of what’s going on with the pitcher, what the hitter is looking for from the pitcher, how the pitcher is trying to set the hitter up, things like that. I love the intricacies of baseball and those little battles that happen throughout the day. Those are very fun for me, and they’re fun to try and get across to the fans.

VL: Did you have any broadcasting idols growing up in the city?

RC: I grew up watching Cubs baseball. Jack Brickhouse was our broadcaster when I was a young kid—and I mean a young kid. You’re talking 4, 5, 6, 7 years old when you’re just watching with bright eyes and listening to how excited Jack Brickhouse would get over a Cubs game and a Cubs win. I think he stood out the most to me as a young kid.

VL: You’re obviously not the first Ron in the WGN Radio booth. Is that legacy a little daunting?

RC: Without question it’s daunting when you look back at the names, from Lou Boudreaux to Vince Lloyd to Brickhouse and all those people. And the analysts—Steve Stone was there forever. But Ron Santo and I became friends when I signed with the Cubs. You know, Ronnie was a third baseman. I was a third baseman. We’d go out after games on the road and go have dinner and hang out. You just loved his passion for everything he did. And if it had something to do with the Cubs, there was nobody more passionate than Ron Santo. It was infectious with everybody. It’s one of those things I’ll always remember. Some of his calls on the air were just priceless. You couldn’t make them up. So it is daunting. As a Cubs fan, you look at that and go, “How cool is this that I’m going to be a part of that family that’s been doing these games since I was a little kid?”

VL: You played for the Cubs in 2001. Do you have a favorite Wrigley Field memory from your time here?

RC: There are a few. I think Opening Day that year. It was great just to be part of Opening Day. I had some good games at Wrigley. You hit a couple of home runs or something like that. I remember a few games like that. But it was like a daily routine of you jog out to third base to start a game, and you look around the stands and go, “Yep, I sat over there. I sat over there. I was with my dad there watching a game.” Now you’re in uniform, and my friends and my family are coming out to Wrigley Field, and I’m on the field. The biggest memory of Wrigley is that—is having that emotion almost every day.

VL: How excited are you to call Wrigley Field your office again?

RC: Wrigley Field and Fenway Park are the last two of a dying breed. It’s baseball. When you walk into Wrigley Field, and you come up from the concourse, and you look down at that green field and the ivy, that to me is what baseball is all about. It’s not the new stadiums and all the big stuff. That’s all great. All these new ballparks are phenomenal. Target Field is great here in Minneapolis. But when you look at those fields like Wrigley Field, that’s what baseball is to me. It’s a nostalgic old look and knowing guys like Babe Ruth were in the batter’s box, and Ernie Banks and Santo and Billy Williams. All these guys have played in that ballpark. That’s what baseball is—the old with the new.

VL: What’s your take on what the Cubs front office is doing to try to build a winner?

RC: What the Cubs are doing is exactly what’s been going on here in Minnesota for the last few years. It’s the only way you can build a team and have it sustain itself. You can’t go out and not have homegrown players make an impact on your club day after day. It just doesn’t work. It might work for half a season. It might work for a season. But it doesn’t sustain itself for the long haul. So you have to build from the bottom up, and you have to have homegrown players contribute in a big way to the success of the organization. Then you add pieces to that. That’s the only way things work in Major League Baseball for any length of time.

VL: You’ve been in baseball your whole life. What do you do to get away from the game?

RC: I do a couple of different things. I’m a big golfer—love to play golf. I live on a golf course here in Minneapolis. So I’ll play some golf in the summer in Chicago. And I’m a bike rider. I love to bike—pedal bike—so I’ll be biking around the city. God knows I’ll probably bike to Wrigley Field a few times.

1 Comment

Loved ready the interview! Will miss Ron on post-game Twins analysis and when he filled in for Bert. Ron has a unique perspective on the game and I will miss hearing it in Twins Territory!

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