Archive for the ‘ Experience Wrigley Field ’ Category

Now Playing: Stretching Out with ESPN personality Michael Wilbon

ESPN commentator Michael Wilbon has never been shy about giving his opinions, whether it’s in print or on camera. And despite his years as a columnist for the Washington Post, it doesn’t take long to realize he’s a die-hard Chicago sports fan. Vine Line caught up with the Northwestern alum when he was on hand for Social Media Night in mid-August to talk about growing up a Cubs fan and his love for Wrigley Field.

Wrigley 100: Before the Confines, there was the West Side Grounds

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(Photo courtesy National Baseball Hall of Fame Library)

Each month in Vine Line, we are looking back at a century of Wrigley Field history. In the January issue, we tackle the pre-Wrigley years when the team called various parks home.

Imagine a world in which Wrigley Field wasn’t the home of the Chicago Cubs. There’s no marquee, no manual scoreboard, no ivy and no bleachers.

Though the Cubs became one of the eight charter members of the National League all the way back in 1876, they didn’t officially move into the Friendly Confines until 1916—two years after the venerable facility was built.

Aside from Fenway Park and the Boston Red Sox, perhaps no stadium is as inextricably linked with its organization as Wrigley Field is with its lovable Cubs. When people travel to Chicago, the nearly 100-year-old stadium is a top tourist destination year after year. It’s a testament to one of the most sacred baseball cathedrals in the game.

But for all the history—the beloved ballpark will celebrate its centennial on April 23—and despite the great stories your grandparents, parents and kids have regarding their many trips to Wrigleyville, there was a time when the Chicago Cubs existed without Wrigley Field.

A century ago, there was no such thing as baseball on Chicago’s North Side. The South and West sides were the epicenter of sports in the city, while the corner of Clark and Addison still served as a cemetery. The Lutheran Church constructed a facility on the property that would one day house Wrigley Field in the 1870s, and they opened an adjoining seminary in 1891.

For the first decade of the 20th century, the Cubs dominated the National League at a stadium called West Side Park—though there were other facilities as well.

Chicago’s National League representative had the same problem finding a suitable place to play home games that much of baseball was experiencing at the time. Poor ballpark conditions, inadequate fields, bad leases and an inconstant fan base turned the NL club later known as the Cubs into a de facto Chicago barnstorming team for nearly 20 years.

From 1876-93 they spent time at the 23rd Street Grounds (1876-77), Lakefront Park with its 200-foot left-field fence (1878-84), West Side Park I (1885-91) and South Side Park (1891-1893). The 1891 overlap came as a result of the organization using West Side Park on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, and South Side Park on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.

At the time, Blue Laws—city- or region-specific ordinances—were still in effect in much of the country (including Chicago), and they effectively limited local recreational and entertainment options on Sundays and prevented any viewing or playing of baseball games. This was during a time when men generally worked six days a week and reserved Sunday for relaxation, often for religious observances.

In 1892, however, the National League removed any restrictions against Sunday baseball, paving the way for Chicago NL club President James A. Hart to take advantage of a prime opportunity. The World’s Fair was set to open in Chicago in May 1893, and Hart realized the global event could help drive his business (and perhaps signal an end to the city’s Blue Laws). The Columbian Exposition’s arrival also meant thousands of people would be visiting Chicago and looking for ways to spend their day off—and their hard-earned money.

Ideally, the management of Chicago’s NL team, then called the Colts, wanted to continue playing its games at South Side Park—located on 35th and Wentworth—due to its close proximity to the World’s Fair, which was occurring at Chicago’s lakefront. The problem with South Side Park was that the initial lease on the stadium still prohibited games from being played on Sundays. As a result, Hart pushed the team west to the West Side Grounds, a facility that was owned by Albert Spalding and John Walsh, also the Colts’ majority owners.

For the 1893 season, home games were still played at South Side Park Monday through Saturday, but the team played its Sunday games on the West Side. The Colts moved into the West Side Grounds full time the following season.

Though it sounds odd in today’s world for an ownership group to have its team play in a ballpark other than the one it owns, Spalding and Walsh viewed the western location that now houses the University of Illinois Medical Center as too far away from the city. Playing ball at the West Side Grounds was originally seen as a major gamble—though it’s one that would eventually be rewarded with solid play from the club.

The West Side Grounds, or West Side Park as it was called at the time, was a spacious wooden ballpark that seated 8,000 fans when the club initially moved in. Home plate was on the corner of Polk and Lincoln (now Wolcott) facing southeast, Wood Street ran behind left field, and Taylor Street’s flats and stores abutted the facility to the south. Though it’s difficult to find accurate dimensions for the stadium, during some of the time the Cubs spent there, center field was 560 feet from home plate. It’s believed it was roughly 340 feet to right and 310 feet to left.

In the early 1900s, a series of renovations added an upper deck and replaced the small row of outfield seats with full bleachers, doubling the stadium’s capacity to 16,000. By 1910, seating had expanded all the way to 30,000. Bleachers were also added to center field in 1908, reducing the outfield distance to 418 feet.

The most eye-catching aspect of the venue was an advertisement that was installed in 1913 and ran down the length of the right-field wall. The enormous ad stood back only about 10 feet from the fence, and it blocked sightlines for many who sat in the back of the bleachers. Like Wrigley Field today, fans were also able to take in a game from the adjoining rooftops.

But perhaps West Side Park’s best feature was the caliber of baseball that was played there. Cubs fans in the early 1900s got to see something people have been fantasizing about for the last century—success at the highest level. As a tenant of the West Side Grounds, the Cubs averaged nearly 100 wins per season over a nine-year span (898 wins from 1904-12). The infield trio of Joe Tinker, Johnny Evers and Frank Chance, along with pitcher Mordecai “Three Finger” Brown, became league stars who were well worth the price of admission.

Charles Webb Murphy’s purchase of the Cubs in July 1905 coincided with one of the club’s most successful runs in franchise history. Between 1906-10, the team played .693 ball (530-235) and captured four NL pennants and two World Series titles (1907 and ’08). The one season during that run in which they didn’t win the pennant, they still managed to win 104 games.
But there was a growing problem. Though there was plenty of success on the field and the stadium was constantly expanded, the park’s infrastructure was starting to give way.

Murphy, who purchased the stadium in December 1908, failed to update the visiting facilities, and rival NL teams complained that the plumbing in their clubhouse often didn’t work. Murphy argued that it wasn’t his job to make visiting teams happy, even after a family of ducks made a home in the clubhouse. Murphy’s West Side Grounds was also being rendered obsolete by the first steel and concrete ballparks, which were being built in 1910.

But it wasn’t just the stadium that was falling apart. The team that became a dynasty in the century’s first decade was aging and beginning to fray at the seams. Following a 104-win campaign in 1910, the Cubs had six straight seasons in which they lost more games than they had the previous year. This run of poor play eventually caught up to the fan base, and attendance numbers began to dwindle.

In 1916, a group headed by Chicago business mogul Charles Weeghman purchased the Cubs and moved them into his new Weeghman Park—or Wrigley Field as it’s known today—a modern steel and concrete facility on the city’s North Side that was opened two years prior to house the Federal League’s Chicago Whales.

As terms of the move, the Weeghman group agreed to pay two years of rent at the West Side stadium while Murphy found a tenant to replace the ballclub. Even though Murphy received his rent checks, he still filed several unsuccessful lawsuits attempting to block the team and the National League from playing Cubs home games on any field other than his own. He’d later claim he was raising money to repurchase the club, though that never came to fruition.

Finally, in October 1919, Murphy finalized a deal to sell the property to the state of Illinois for $400,000. The space was to be used as the future home of the Illinois State Hospital and the University of Illinois Medical School. The stadium was torn down in 1920.

The West Side Grounds certainly did not have the hold on the hearts and minds of visitors that the Friendly Confines has today. It lacked the marquee, the ivy and all the other attributes that make Wrigley Field the special place it is.

It did, however, house more than 20 years of Cubs history and some of the best teams ever to play the game. Wrigley Field has deservedly received so much praise that the West Side Grounds is not much more than an afterthought these days. But hosting four World Series appearances in five years is no small feat, and for that, the West Side Grounds should always be remembered.

Now Playing: Clark the Cub makes his debut

Clark, the newly introduced Chicago Cubs mascot, made his debut Monday night along with more than a dozen prospects in the Cubs Rookie Development Program at Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center’s Pediatric Developmental Center. Together, they helped reinforce positive activities being taught to children with autism and other developmental challenges.

Clark was joined at Advocate Illinois Masonic by prospects Albert Almora, Javier Baez, Kris Bryant, C.J. Edwards, Kyle Hendricks, Pierce Johnson, Eric Jokisch, Mike Olt, Neil Ramirez, Armando Rivero, Rubi Silva, Jorge Soler, Christian Villanueva and Arodys Vizcaino.

The players divided into four rooms and hosted activities for the children and their siblings, including an interview room where kids asked questions of players and practiced social skills; a reading room where players and kids looked at pictures of Wrigley Field and read stories about baseball; a game room where kids practiced sportsmanship in matches against their Cubs counterparts; and a gym where Clark and players stressed the importance of learning from others through pre-activity stretching drills and practiced motor activity skills during a ball-toss drill.

The next stops for Clark will be the Cubs 100 Gifts of Service 2014 Caravan Tour and the Cubs Convention.

The Cubs unveil their new mascot, Clark

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Kids, meet Clark, the Cubs’ new mascot.

The Cubs will introduce the organization’s first official team mascot Monday evening when Clark visits children at Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center’s Pediatric Development Center. He will make his debut alongside more than a dozen Cubs prospects who are currently participating in the Rookie Development Program.

“The Cubs are thrilled to welcome Clark as the team’s official mascot,” said Cubs Senior Director of Marketing Alison Miller. “Clark is a young, friendly Cub who can’t wait to interact with our other young Cubs fans. He’ll be a welcoming presence for families at Wrigley Field and an excellent ambassador for the team in the community.”

After consistently hearing through survey feedback and fan interviews that the Cubs needed more family-friendly entertainment, the team surveyed fans and held focus groups to determine the interest in and benefits of introducing an official mascot. The appetite for more family-friendly initiatives became clear, and the concept of a mascot who interacts in the community, engages with young fans and is respectful of the game was widely supported.

Clark will play a big role in the Cubs Charities’ mission of targeting improvement in health and wellness, fitness, and education for children and families at risk. Young fans can see him at the Cubs Caravan, Cubs On the Move Fitness Programs, hospital visits and other Cubs events.

On game days, Clark will greet fans as they enter Wrigley Field, and he’ll stop by the Wrigley Field First Timer’s Booth to welcome new guests. The mascot will also help kids run the bases on Family Sundays.

The young Cub will interact with fans at Wrigley Field all season long at Clark’s Clubhouse, where he’ll spend most of his time during Cubs games.

Cubs Spring Training tickets on sale Saturday

Hunt Chicago Cubs Baseball Training Complex 12-2-13 (19)

They say it’s best to think about being somewhere warm when it’s cold outside. How does Mesa, Ariz., sound?

Spring baseball is just around the corner, and single-game Cubs Spring Training tickets will be available this weekend. Starting Saturday, Jan. 11 at 10 a.m. MST/11 a.m. CST, fans can purchase tickets by phone at 1-800-THE-CUBS or at cubs.com. Fans already in Mesa can get tickets at the new Cubs Park box office at that same time and can also get a sneak peak of the ballpark between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m.

The first game at Cubs Park will take place on Thursday, Feb. 27, against the Diamondbacks. The complete 2014 schedule can be found at cubs.com/mesa.

“We’re excited about our inaugural season at Cubs Park,” said Justin Piper, general manager of Spring Training business operations. “This new facility is going to be a popular attraction for Cubs and baseball fans all season long. Anyone planning to visit us for games this year will want to purchase tickets early.”

Fans with questions can email mesa@cubs.com.

Cubs unveil A Century of Wrigley Field book

Wrigley

(Photo by Stephen Green)

Major League Baseball and the Chicago Cubs officially unveiled A Century of Wrigley Field: The Official History of the Friendly Confines, a retrospective book with stories and rare archival images to celebrate 100 years of Wrigley Field.

The book is available today for pre-order at Cubs.com, and 200 advance copies are on sale now at the Cubs Store on Clark and Addison, with additional copies arriving on Dec. 12. The book will have a retail price of $50.

The book features exclusive tributes from Cubs owner Tom Ricketts and an array of other celebrities including Jimmy Buffet, Chris Chelios, Mike Ditka and more.

For more information, visit the link above.

Cubs Holiday Ticket Packs on sale Friday

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(Photo by Stephen Green)

The Cubs unveiled their new Holiday Ticket Packs Wednesday, giving fans an early opportunity to grab some seats for the 2014 season.

Tickets will go on sale on Friday, Nov. 29 at 10 a.m. CST and will start at $98 for two seats to four games. Fans will get to select from three different four-game packages with seats available in the Budweiser Bleachers as well as the seating bowl. Packages can be customized from two tickets per game up to 10.

Holiday Pack A
Tue., Apr. 8, 7:05 p.m., Cubs vs. Pittsburgh Pirates
Wed., July 30, 7:05 p.m., Cubs vs. Colorado Rockies
Wed., Sept. 17, 7:05 p.m., Cubs vs. Cincinnati Reds
Tue., Sept. 23, 7:05 p.m., Cubs vs. St. Louis Cardinals

Holiday Pack B
Sat., Apr. 5, TBD, Cubs vs. Philadelphia Phillies
Tue., Apr. 22, 7:05 p.m., Cubs vs. Arizona Diamondbacks
Wed., Aug. 13, 7:05 p.m., Cubs vs. Milwaukee Brewers
Tue., Sept. 16, 7:05 p.m., Cubs vs. Cincinnati Reds

Holiday Pack C
Wed., Apr. 9, 7:05 p.m., Cubs vs. Pittsburgh Pirates
Mon., Apr. 21, 7:05 p.m., Cubs vs. Arizona Diamondbacks
Wed., Aug. 20, 7:05 p.m., Cubs vs. San Francisco Giants
Wed., Sept. 24, 7:05 p.m., Cubs vs. St. Louis Cardinals

For more information or to purchase your tickets, visit cubs.com/holiday.

Now Playing: Stretching Out with Arsenio Hall

It’s been almost 20 years since Arsenio Hall had a top late night talk show, but he’s back in the game. The actor and comedian recently started hosting a new show, Arsenio, which made its debut Sept. 9 on WGN. Vine Line caught up with the former Celebrity Apprentice winner to discuss his favorite times at Wrigley Field, his lackluster pitching career and, most importantly, the infield dirt.

From the Pages of Vine Line: Remembering 1998 – Part I

Even the biggest baseball fans can understand why outsiders occasionally find the game a little slow. Viewers have to love the chess match between pitcher and hitter, because the game moves at its own pace, runs without any sort of clock and even allows for pitchers who enter as reserves to warm up on the event’s time.

But 15 years ago, the 1998 Cubs squad became the must-see event of the summer—and not just in Chicago. Viewers around the country tuned in to WGN every day to see Sammy Sosa, Kerry Wood and the cardiac Cubs stage one of the most dramatic seasons in Chicago baseball history.

Of course, Sosa’s historic assault on the record books probably had a lot to do with that. He and Cardinals first baseman Mark McGwire blasted bombs at a dizzying pace all season long, which kept the nation’s eyes focused squarely on the NL Central. But while Sosa may have been the headliner on the North Side, the Cubs were an entertaining bunch from top to bottom.

Day after day, it seemed like the team was in a dogfight, and every win turned out to be vital, as the Cubs need an extra, 163rd contest to finalize their postseason push and give Chicago fans their first taste of meaningful October baseball in nearly a decade.

The 1998 season brought an array of emotions to the Wrigley faithful: the sorrow of broadcasting legends lost, the frustration of late-season opportunities that slipped out of the team’s hands—or gloves—and the excitement of the postseason run. Plus, it was the coming out party for a 6-foot-5 “kid” from Texas who struck out 20 opposing batters in only his fifth major league start—and did it against one of the most prolific offenses in the NL. You just can’t make this stuff up.

To commemorate all the ups and downs, Vine Line celebrates our 10 greatest moments from that historic 1998 campaign in the October issue of the magazine. Today marks the first part of the 10-part series, which we’ll post here on the blog in the coming days.

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(Photo by Stephen Green)

4/3/98—Dutchie Caray honors her late husband

It was an uplifting year at the Friendly Confines, despite the loss of two of the most legendary voices in Cubs history. On Feb. 11, 1998, broadcasting icon Harry Caray died of cardiac arrest. Then Jack Brickhouse, who did play-by-play for the Cubs from 1948–81, passed away six months later on Aug. 6.

The Cubs honored the late Caray during the home opener on April 3 by having his wife, Dutchie, sing “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” during the seventh-inning stretch, just as her husband had done countless times. Before the top of the seventh ended and prior to Dutchie taking the mic, the crowd broke out in a chant of, “Harry! Harry!”

“It was unbelievable. The people just took over for me,” said Dutchie Caray at the time. “These fans are so crazy about Harry. I don’t know if they’ll ever forget him.”

Dutchie wrapped up the touching tribute by hugging Harry’s grandson Chip, who had taken over in the broadcast booth, while blue and white balloons were released to the strains of “Amazing Grace.”

1000 Words: See you in 2014, Wrigley Field

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(Photo by Stephen Green)

As the Cubs held off the playoff-bound Pirates to claim a 4-2 win Wednesday afternoon, it marks the end of home games at Wrigley Field for 2013. Next season, the Cubs will start on the road at Pittsburgh before heading to the Friendly Confines, with the home opener slated for Friday, April 4 against Philadelphia. The 2014 season will mark Wrigley Field’s 100th anniversary and will be celebrated all season long on the north side.

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