Results tagged ‘ Edwin Jackson ’

Now Playing: Highlights from the 2013 Cubs Convention

The 28th annual Cubs Convention is in the books, and Vine Line was there for the entire weekend. We were front and center for the opening ceremonies, saw everything the new hotel had to offer, and got an opportunity to debrief with Convention newbies like Edwin Jackson and new assistant hitting coach Rob Deer.

2013 Cubs Convention is up and running

Szczur

The 28th annual Cubs Convention kicked off tonight in the Grand ballroom of the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers.

A per tradition, the Convention kicked off with the Opening Ceremonies. Cubs owner Tom Ricketts began by talking about his family’s commitment to achieving three goals: winning a world championship, preserving Wrigley Field and being a good neighbor in Chicago. He also spoke about Chicago Cubs Charities work with the RBI Program (Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities) and introduced a group of kids and coaches from the program.

The Chicago Cubs RBI program is run through the Union League Boys and Girls Clubs in Chicago and supported through a grant from Cubs Care, which provides $100,000 to fund the entire effort. RBI offers nearly 300 inner city youth the opportunity to play ball and participate in weekend tournaments. Ricketts announced that 11 high school seniors of the Chicago Cubs RBI program have been offered college scholarships to play baseball next year.

After a video about the team, the players entered the hall down a red carpet that ran through the middle of the crowd. This allowed fans an opportunity to interact with the 2013 team. The Cubs introduced veteran players, including new veteran Kerry Wood, and some of the top prospects, who have been in town all week as part of the Rookie Development Program. Fans also got a chance to see many of the newest Cubs, including free agent signee Edwin Jackson, up close.

The evening ended with an autograph hunt game that saw players, prospects and alumni scattered all over the Convention hall. Top prospects Matt Szczur and Javier Baez joined us at the Vine Line booth.

The Convention starts back up tomorrow morning with the Ricketts Family Forum at 9 a.m.

Cubs 2013 ZiPs projections unveiled

CASTRO S

(Photo by Stephen Green)

Each year, sabermetric enthusiast Dan Szymborski compiles projected stats for the upcoming season for all major league players. Using an intricate formula, the computer-based projections, better known as ZiPS (sZymborski Projection System), give an estimate for most notable offensive and pitching categories. Late last week, Szymborski unveiled his projections for the 2013 Cubs.

It should come as no surprise that shortstop Starlin Castro and first baseman Anthony Rizzo are projected to make the biggest impact in 2013, each slated for a 4.0 WAR (wins above an average replacement player). Castro is projected to hit .294/.332/.446 (AVG/OBP/SLG) with 14 homers, 12 triples, 24 stolen bases and 77 RBI. The slugging Rizzo rates out at .279/.349/.503, with 31 homers, 109 driven in and 32 doubles.

On the pitching side, Jeff Samardzija projects to be the best starter with a 3.1 WAR. He’s estimated to throw 169 innings, strike out 172 batters and record a 3.62 ERA.

According to Szymborski, newcomer Edwin Jackson should have an ERA around 3.91 over 186.2 innings and fan 159 hitters. His estimated WAR of 2.8 is slightly better than Matt Garza’s 2.7.

Projected WAR of starting pitching candidates:

Jeff Samardzija: 3.1
Edwin Jackson: 2.8
Matt Garza: 2.7
Scott Baker: 1.6
Carlos Villanueva: 1.4
Travis Wood: 1.3
Scott Feldman: 1.0

Projected WAR of starting lineup:

Starlin Castro: 4.0
Anthony Rizzo: 4.0
Darwin Barney: 2.3
Alfonso Soriano: 1.8
Welington Castillo: 1.6
David Dejesus: 1.1
Nate Schierholtz: 0.8
Ian Stewart: 0.4

Reliving Edwin Jackson’s 2010 no-hitter

Arizona Diamondbacks v Los Angeles Dodgers

(Photo by Jeff Gross/Getty Images)

Even with the increasing number of no-hitters thrown over the past few seasons, getting 27 batters to record outs without surrendering a hit is still an incredible feat. On Wednesday, the Cubs officially acquired starter Edwin Jackson, who joins teammate Matt Garza as members of the no-hit club.

Jackson, whose heater routinely reaches into the mid-90s, has no-hit stuff every time he steps on the mound, but his June 25, 2010, interleague matchup with the Rays didn’t have the makings of a dominant outing. Instead the game became a nine-inning, grind-it-out affair—and a statistical anomaly—for the Diamondbacks pitcher, who improved as the game went along.

The then-26-year-old’s first inning resulted in a pair of walks, a wild pitch and 27 pitches thrown, but the host Rays left runners stranded at the corners. Jackson was only slightly better in the second inning, allowing two walks on 21 pitches and stranding runners on first and second. Fortunately in the top half of that inning, Adam LaRoche hit a solo home run on a line drive to right to give Arizona a 1-0 lead, which would prove to be the game’s final score.

The bottom of the third kicked off with a trio of walks to load the bases. But Jackson got out of the jam by inducing a shallow flyout and a pair of groundouts. Through his first three innings, he’d given up seven walks and thrown 72 pitches. But despite his rough start, Jackson would settle down for the remainder of the game.

He cruised through the fourth and fifth, retiring the side in order. Though he hit B.J. Upton in the sixth, Jackson went 1-2-3 in the seventh and got out of the eighth without surrendering a hit despite an error from third baseman Stephen Drew. Jackson struck out leadoff man Upton to start the ninth, and got Hank Blalock to fly out to left. After Willy Aybar reached on a walk, Jackson forced Jason Bartlett to ground out to short, ending the game and touching off a Diamondbacks celebration.

The righty’s final line read: 9 IP, 0 H, 0 ER, 6 K, 8 BB, 149 pitches thrown (only 79 for strikes).

“It’s one of the crazier games that I’ve had this year, especially starting out like it did—not being able to find the strike zone with the fastball. Good thing I could throw the slider for strikes at any count,” Jackson told Adam Berry of MLB.com at the time. “That just saved me and resurrected my game, to even be able to have a chance to do what I did tonight is crazy.”

While Jackson’s efforts were far from perfect—and it might not have been the most dominant no-no of all time—he entered the record books with the D-backs second no-hitter in franchise history.

1000 Words: All eyes on Edwin

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(Photo by David Durochik)

The Cubs made right-handed pitcher Edwin Jackson the first big free agent signing of the nascent Theo Epstein/Jed Hoyer era yesterday. Jackson, who has played for eight different teams in his 10-year big league career, said he was happy for the stability the four-year, $52 million contract will provide and optimistic about the Cubs’ future.

“It’s an organization that has upside,” Jackson said. “It’s just a matter of getting the right pieces in order and having everyone play on the same page. It’s definitely a team that can go out and win a lot of ballgames, regardless of what anyone says.”

Cubs agree to terms with RHP Edwin Jackson

EJax

After narrowly missing out on free agent starter Anibal Sanchez last month, the Cubs rang in the New Year by coming to terms with right-handed pitcher Edwin Jackson. The 29-year-old signed a reported four-year, $52 million deal—the largest given out by Cubs President of Baseball Operations Theo Epstein and General Manager Jed Hoyer during their brief tenure—and should be a key piece of the Cubs’ rotation in 2013 and beyond.

“He fits very well on the team in 2013, but we think he fits even better with the team going forward as a core member of what we’re trying to build here in Chicago,” Hoyer said. “His talent, his age, and everything we’ve learned about him as a teammate were all part of the reasons we decided to add him to the roster.”

Jackson has called more than a few places home since his 2003 debut with the Dodgers. The 6-foot-3 power arm, who has averaged 94.1 MPH on his fastball throughout his career, was selected out of high school in the sixth round of the 2001 draft by Los Angeles, and was the youngest player in the National League in 2003 and 2004. He was traded to the Rays in 2006 and got his first regular work in a major league rotation in 2007. After the Rays’ 2008 playoff run, Jackson’s travels really started.

Since 2009, the starter has had stints with the Tigers, Diamondbacks, White Sox, Cardinals and Nationals. The Cubs will be the seventh team Jackson has played for since 2008 (excluding his trade from the White Sox to the Blue Jays, who sent him to the Cardinals later that day, on July 27, 2011).

“It definitely feels great [to have signed a long-term deal],” Jackson said. “I think the most assuring part is that you have a chance to relax and know that you’re going to be somewhere for a while. You don’t have to feel like you have to prove yourself every year. I think it’s definitely going to help for me to just go out and have fun and not have to worry about anything else.”

Jackson spent last season with the NL East champion Nationals, where he posted a 10-11 record and a 4.03 ERA. The Nationals did not tender Jackson a qualifying offer, so he will not cost the Cubs a draft pick.

In 10 major league seasons, Jackson owns a 70-71 record with a 4.40 ERA and 969 strikeouts in 1,268.2 innings (6.9 K/9). He has reached 31 or more starts in each of his last six seasons, has recorded double-digit wins in each of the last five seasons and has exceeded 180.0 innings pitched in each of the last five seasons. The 2009 All-Star with Detroit also pitched a no-hitter for the Diamondbacks in 2010 and won a World Series with the Cardinals in 2011.

“Edwin is 29 years old, and he’s already had six consecutive seasons of making 30-plus starts,” Hoyer said. “He’s proven his durability, he’s proven his talents, but he’s also still at an age where we think he can get even better.”

The Cubs have been extremely aggressive in remaking their rotation this offseason. Prior to the Jackson signing, they had already signed starters Scott Baker, Scott Feldman and Carlos Villanueva to complement Matt Garza, Jeff Samardzija and Travis Wood.

“As a pitching staff, when you get pitchers that are competitive and pitchers that want to go out and win, it definitely helps,” said Jackson, who pitched alongside Garza in Tampa Bay. “Everyone is pulling on each other’s coattails, and it’s a positive competitiveness.”

Jackson has a 1-2 career record at Wrigley Field with a 7.94 ERA and 11 strikeouts in 17 innings.

Jacksonstats

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