Results tagged ‘ Ryne Sandberg ’

Game 162

Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for INSIDE THE IVY LOGO.jpgYesterday brought the 2009 season to a close, and despite the Cubs being out of it, the 162nd game reminded me why we stick it through to the end.

This time it was to see Sam Fuld pick up his first major-league RBI. And of course, he did it with some style, hitting a home run to deep rightfield to get it done all by himself. Fuld made a name for himself — and rewarded many of the organization’s scouts and minor-league coaches who have praised him for his baseball IQ and plate discipline — this season with a number of full-extension catches as well as a .299 batting average and .409 on-base percentage.

Being that it was Fuld’s first home run, it was worth paying close attention to the dugout’s reaction. Sure enough, the team gave Fuld the silent treatment while the outfielder beckoned them on a little bit. They held still until Fuld walked by Derrek Lee, who reached back to give him a big pat on the back.

“I kind of sniffed out what they were doing when I got back in there,” Fuld told reporters. “But it meant a lot to me.”

Once again, Cubs fans, you showed why you are the best in baseball. After Derrek Lee’s eighth-inning flyout, the near-sellout crowd gave him a standing ovation for his outstanding season.

“I wasn’t expecting it; I didn’t know how to react,” Lee told reporters after the game. “I appreciate it. It was really cool.”

Thanks to all of our fans who supported us at the ballpark or across the nation by subscribing to Vine Line this season.

Seen around the ballpark this last weekend:


_DSC5502.JPG?
The Alfonso Soriano promotional poster from 2008 hanging in the clubhouse, with a bandage stuck over his left knee.

 

? Ted Lilly and Ryan Dempster continuing to go on runs together, even after Lilly had thrown his last pitch in 2009.

 

? Top Cubs prospects Brett Jackson, Casey Coleman and Kyler Burke wearing eager smiles as they were taken through the Cubs clubhouse to meet the big-leaguers and on the field for a ceremony with Double-A manager Ryne Sandberg (right).

 

? Sandberg and Lou Piniella talking Cubs baseball in the home dugout, minutes before the national anthem on Saturday.

 

– Sean Ahmed

Five Minutes with….Denise Richards

Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for FIVE MINUTES LOGOWell, hey, you can’t fault a girl for trying.

When actress Denise Richards came by on May 1 to sing conduct the seventh-inning stretch and sing “Take Me Out to the Ball Game,” she looked intent on getting it right. Before the stretch, she tuned up with Lowry organist Gary Pressy and then reviewed her sheet music, humming quietly to herself. Richards is from Downers Grove, which is about an hour west of Chicago.

The star of such films as “Goldeneye” Starship Troopers” and “Wild Things”, Denise Richards was in town filming season two of her reality show, “It’s Complicated.”

While her rendition of “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” has been criticized, it’s probably not because of the singing, but rather that she read off her sheet music. But to her credit, he admitted it was tough.

Vine Line: So how was your experience conducting the seventh-inning stretch?

Denise Richards: Horrifying. A singer I am not. [laughs] But I guess I can sing at a baseball game for fun.


RICHARDS DENISE 050109  05.JPGVL:
You’ve been a Bond girl, a Starship Trooper, a Wild Thing, how does that compare to being a conductor of the seventh-inning stretch?

DR: Hey, it’s up there! But really, it’s an honor to be up there.

VL: Is it more nervewracking to sing than be in front of the camera?

DR: Oh yeah, definitely. It really is. It’s something I don’t do on a normal basis, especially in front of all those people.

VL:: Now, have you been a Cubs fan all your life, being from the Chicago area?

DR: My mom was. She was a huge Ryne Sandberg fan. That’s why I’m wearing her number.

VL: I know you’re in town to film, but to also promote kidney cancer awareness, too?

DR: Yeah, we lost my mom (Joanie) to kidney cancer a little over a year ago and the Kidney Cancer Foundation is based in Chicago. I got in touch with them and wanted to do something in honor of my mom to help create awareness of kidney cancer. There’s no cure for it.

VL: How does filming for a reality show differ than a motion picture?

DR: It’s hard to do a reality show. I mean you still have to have it make sense. You’re not given lines or anything of course, but you still have to make it entertaining. But it’s actually very conducive to my lifestyle with the kids, being a single mom, and I get to hang out with my friends while filming it, so it’s a lot of fun.

–Mike Huang

 

Vine Line Extra: The 10th Inning with…Lin Brehmer

 In the April edition of Vine Line, we debuted a back-page column called “The 10th Inning with….” which offers fan perspectives from the outside looking in. The fans are mainly celebrities or prominent personalities around Chicago giving their impressions on all things Cubs. 
    We’ve received a nice amount of positive feedback on the column and hopefully it will appear every other month, alternating with “Stretching Out with…”
    Popular WXRT Radio on-air personality Lin Brehmer was nice enough to volunteer his services as our inaugural columnist. He has been a die-hard Cubs fan since 1984, when he moved to Chicago. Here is his story:

Lin Head Shot.jpg   Cubs fans come from every corner. They grow up at the corner of Southport Avenue and Irving Park Road, and come back to discover a post office where their houses used to be. They grow up on the farms of Iowa, where the crackle of a transistor radio transports them to another world. My collision course was nothing short of providential.
   Raised in a region where the pinstripes were of a different color, four brothers from Oak Park, Ill., introduced me to the lineup of Kessinger, Beckert, Williams, Santo, Banks, Hundley, Altman and Phillips. We roamed the asphalt schoolyards of New York looking for a game. Playing stickball, Joel, Adam, Benji, D.K. and I would take turns being the Chicago Cubs or the New York Yankees.
   In 1970, we started the Cleo James fan club for the unheralded and unloved Cubs outfielder. This past October, 38 years later, Benji sent me an official looking document that reads:

“For Lin Brehmer: Founding Member and President-for-Life of THE CLEO JAMES FAN CLUB. In honor of, and appreciation for, Mr. Cleo James, Outfielder, Chicago Cubs (1970-1971).”

    And then there’s an anonymous quotation: “He won some, he lost some, but he suited up for them all.” In the middle of the document in a protective plastic sleeve is a baseball card of good old number 24. On the back of the baseball card we learn that Cleo’s hobby was table tennis.
    I first arrived in Chicago in 1984 on the promise of World Series tickets.
    Perhaps, I was naive.
    1984. The year of nicknames. Sarge. Ryno. Penguin. The baseball world was giddy with talk of the Cubs that summer. It was the season that Whitey Herzog, the eminence grise of the Cardinals, called Ryne Sandberg the greatest player he’d ever seen.
    My job interview was grueling. I spent the summer eating stuffed pizza and watching the Cubs. By September, I was hunting for a place to live. Tooling around the North Side in a borrowed Mazda, I drove to the corner of Clark and Addison and stopped.
 I am not a casual baseball fan. As a skinny pre-teen, I was a fire-balling southpaw for such teams as Lazar’s Kosher Meats, Gerard Towers, and the star-crossed Michael C. Fina Jewelers.
    In 1971 and 1972, I was the MVP of my high school baseball team. When Rotisserie Baseball was invented at the start of the ’80s, I immediately took my team, Brehmer’s Bombers, to the cellar. I’ve coached youth baseball for six years.
    So that first view of Wrigley Field might as well have been accompanied by a cinematic choir of angels or by the sonorous voice of James Earl Jones summoning me, “Lin Brehmer, this is your destiny.”
    The Cubs did not go to the World Series in 1984. I know because I watched Game 5 against the Padres in my landlord’s apartment right beneath my own on the 3700 block of N. Wayne Avenue.
    And a strange fever grew. 
    Living four blocks from Wrigley Field, I spent the next few baseball seasons in the right-centerfield bleachers with Marty, Mars, Wendy, Norm and Sara.
    My apartment window had a sign in the window that read “No Lights In Wrigley Field,” and as soon as lights were installed, we protested by buying a night game/weekend season ticket package. Aisle 239. Row 4.
    ‘ve been to 28 out of the last 29 Opening Days. My mental scrapbook holds many images: Mark Grace’s torrid postseason run in ’89. Gaetti’s home run in the ’98 one-game wild-card playoff. The nine-run comeback against the Rockies in the summer of ’08.
    And my favorite moment of all: Andre Dawson’s final home game in ’87. That was the year that Dawson offered the Cubs a blank check for his salary and won the MVP for a last-place club.
    All season long the bleachers would pay tribute to Dawson’s unrelenting commitment by bowing to him as he jogged out to rightfield. Andre Dawson was cut from different marble than most media-savvy ball players of the modern era. He was as stoic a presence as I have ever seen in a major-league outfield.
    On that last day, Dawson hit his 49th home run. When he trotted out to his place, he faced the bleachers for the first time, raised his arms in the air and bowed repeatedly to the fans. The gesture was so out of character that it spoke to the man’s caliber.
     I have watched the Cubs now through my son’s eyes. He went to 15 games before he was 1 year old. As a toddler, he ran up the ramps and then down the ramps. He watched the “El” from the rightfield corner. And one afternoon I looked to my left to see him with a pencil in his hand, peanut shells scattered on an open scorebook, writing 6-4-3 DP. A Cubs fan born and bred. A kid gathering stories to pass on to another generation. A young man who will understand there is no winning without losing.
    Robert Browning, who knew nothing of baseball but much of human nature, once wrote, “That heaven should exceed a man’s grasp or what’s a heaven for.”
    Every year, I take a magic marker and draw an X through the month of October. That’s because I plan on being at Wrigley Field through the end of that month.

Lin Brehmer has been the morning disc jockey at 93XRT since 1991. He first came to the station in 1984 so he could go to the World Series at Wrigley Field.

To subscribe to Vine Line, visit http://chicago.cubs.mlb.com/chc/fan_forum/vineline.jsp 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,078 other followers