Results tagged ‘ Vine Line ’

Cubs Minor League Recap: 9/1/14

All six minor league affiliates wrapped up their regular seasons this weekend, with Daytona, Kane County and Boise all qualifying for postseason play. Here are some highlights from yesterday’s minor league action:

Iowa Cubs (74-70)
T-2nd Place (-2.5)

Iowa finished the season with a five-game winning streak, routing Oklahoma City at home yesterday, 11-1.

  • RHP Dae-Eun Rhee finished the season by extending his scoreless innings streak to 13.1 innings in his second-straight win, and tying a career-high with 11 strikeouts (also done Aug. 19, 2011, with Daytona).
  • RF Ryan Kalish (.251) tied a career high with four hits (last done June 9, 2012, with Pawtucket of the International League), scoring twice, doubling (14) and driving in two (37).
  • C Eli Whiteside (.214) went 3-for-5 with two doubles (13) and a season-high three RBI (21).
  • SS Elliot Soto (.241) also went 3-for-5 with a double (4).
  • CF Jae-Hoon Ha (.286) singled twice.
  • DH Kris Bryant (.295) singled and drove in his 52nd run since joining Iowa. He finished the season with a .325 average, a minor-league best 43 home runs, and 110 RBI between Tennessee and Iowa.

Tennessee Smokies (33-37)
2nd Place (-3.0)

The Smokies wrapped up the season with a 5-1 loss to host Chattanooga.

  • SS Addison Russell (.294) recorded his 18th multihit game, including his 11th double.
  • LF Pin-Chieh Chen (.232) singled twice from the leadoff spot.
  • C Charles Cutler (.310) tallied his 14th double and walked twice.
  • The Smokies were 0-for-10 with runners in scoring position, and left 11 runners on base.

Daytona Cubs (41-27)
1st Place (+3.5)

After finishing the regular season on Sunday, the Cubs had a day off before Game 1 of the FSL North Championship tonight vs. Dunedin.

Kane County Cougars (45-27)
1st Place (+3.5)

Kane County dropped a 12-inning contest, 6-5, at home against Peoria. The Cougars finished with a franchise-best 91-49 record on the season.

  • C Mark Zagunis (.280) went 2-for-4 with two walks, a double (6) and a stolen base (5) from the leadoff spot.
  • Three other Cougars—DH Chesny Young (.324), RF Yasiel Balaguert (.252) and 1B Cael Brockmeyer (.297)—had two hits apiece. Balaguert finished with a seven-game hitting streak (.393/11-for-28).
  • RHP Michael Wagner (3.23) allowed three runs (two earned) over two innings to suffer his second blown save.
  • RHP Jasvir Rakkar (3-1, 0.87) allowed just his second earned run of the season (20.2 IP) in 2.1 frames, ending up with his first loss.

Boise Hawks (19-19)
3rd Place (-7.0)

Boise overcame a three-run deficit in the ninth, topping Salem-Keizer, 6-5, on a walk-off single from 2B Jason Vosler.

  • SS Gleyber Torres (.393) went 3-for-5 with a run, a double (2), a triple (3) and two RBI (4). He has 11 hits, two doubles and three triples in seven games since joining Boise.
  • 1B Alex Tomasovich (.311) singled twice and scored a run.
  • PH Justin Marra (.279) doubled to improve to 4-for-5 as a pinch-hitter.
  • RF-LHP Charlie White (2-0, 2.25) earned his second win in as many career appearances as a pitcher, allowing one earned run in the ninth before helping the offense with a walk in the bottom of the frame.

Mesa Cubs (9-19)
5th Place (-11.0)

Mesa finished the regular season with a 22-34 overall record.

Now Playing: The Cubs honor U.S. champion Jackie Robinson West Little League at Wrigley Field

Chicago’s Jackie Robinson West All-Stars, who claimed the U.S. Little League title and played in the Little League World Series against South Korea, joined the Cubs for Monday’s game against the Milwaukee Brewers. The Little League team enjoyed a day at Wrigley Field with teammates, coaches and their families. Before the game, Cubs players celebrated JRW’s accomplishments by wearing the Little League team’s home jerseys and ball caps during pregame routines.

JRW had a meet-and-greet with Cubs players, toured the clubhouse, was recognized in the pregame ceremony—which included the team’s coach, Darold Butler, throwing out the game’s ceremonial first pitch—and led the crowd in “Take me Out to the Ballgame” during the seventh-inning stretch.

The Cubs-worn JRW jerseys and ball caps, along with two jerseys signed by the entire JRW team, will be up for auction through Cubs Charities at www.Cubs.com/auction. Bids for jerseys will start at $100, and hats will start at $45. All proceeds will benefit Jackie Robinson West Little League.

2000s Homestand Promotions and Guests: 9/1/14-9/7/14

Prior

Mark Prior and the Cubs celebrating after they clinched the 2003 NL Central Division. (Photo by Stephen Green)

The 2000s saw three first place finishes at Wrigley Field and dazzling performances from players like Derrek Lee, Aramis Ramirez, Mark Prior and Kerry Wood. Starting Monday, Sept. 1, the Cubs welcome the Milwaukee Brewers and Pittsburgh Pirates to town for a 2000s-themed celebration. Fans can relive the decade along with Guardians of the Galaxy star Chris Pratt, Jon Lovitz and many more. And on Labor Day, the Cubs will celebrate the U.S. Little League Champion Jackie Robinson West All-Stars.

Here are the other guests and promotions you’ll find at the Friendly Confines during the six-game set.

2000s Homestand Recap, Sept. 1-7

Monday, Sept. 1 (Labor Day), Chicago Cubs vs. Milwaukee Brewers, 1:20 p.m.

  • Special Event: Salute to Armed Forces Day
  • Pregame recognition, first pitch, seventh-inning stretch: U.S. Little League Champion Jackie Robinson West All-Stars
  • Pregame ceremony: Salute to Armed Forces Day guests
  • Broadcast: WGN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, Cubs.com

Tuesday, Sept. 2, Chicago Cubs vs. Milwaukee Brewers, 7:05 p.m.

  • Promotion: Gatorade Protein Bars (postgame distribution to 5,000 fans)
  • Seventh-inning stretch: Jimy Sohns, lead singer of Chicago-native rock band The Shadows of Knight
  • Broadcast: CSN-TV+, WGN 720-AM Radio, WRTO 1200-AM Spanish Radio, Cubs.com

Wednesday, Sept. 3, Chicago Cubs vs. Milwaukee Brewers, 7:05 p.m.

  • Special Event: Oktoberfest Celebration
  • Pregame performance: Jesse White Tumblers
  • First pitches: Actor Chris Pratt from Parks and Recreation; Vicki Santo and Logan Burke, guest of Ron and Vicki Santo Diabetic Alert Dog Foundation
  • Seventh-inning stretch: TBD
  • Broadcast: CSN-TV+, WGN 720-AM Radio, WRTO 1200-AM Spanish Radio, Cubs.com

Friday, Sept. 5, Chicago Cubs vs. Pittsburgh Pirates, 1:20 p.m.

  • Promotion: Greg Maddux 3000th Strikeout Bobblehead presented by Bank of America (first 10,000 fans)
  • Seventh-inning stretch: Cast members from the NightBlue Theatre show Clemente: The Legend of 21
  • Broadcast: WGN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, Cubs.com

Saturday, Sept. 6, Chicago Cubs vs. Pittsburgh Pirates, 3:05 p.m.

  • First pitch and seventh-inning stretch: John Lovitz, actor and comedian
  • Broadcast: CSN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, Cubs.com

Sunday, Sept. 7, Chicago Cubs vs. Pittsburgh Pirates, 1:20 p.m.

  • Throwback uniforms: 2008 home uniform
  • Promotion: 2000s Clark Build-a-Bear presented by Bank of America (first 5,000 children)
  • First pitch and seventh-inning stretch: TBD
  • Broadcast: WGN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, Cubs.com

For more information on Wrigley Field’s 100th birthday celebration, please visit www.wrigleyfield100.com.

 

Cubs Minor League Recap: 8/28/14

The Cougars racked up another win, but Tennessee was no-hit, Boise lost in extras, and Mesa couldn’t overcome an early deficit Thursday. Iowa and Daytona both had the day off. Here are some highlights from yesterday’s minor league action:

Tennesee Smokies (32-34)
2nd Place (-1.0)

Chattanooga pitcher Andres Santiago tossed a nine-inning no-hitter and struck out 12 to beat the visiting Smokies, 1-0.

  • RHP Felix Pena gave up one earned run over five innings, striking out four.
  • 3B Christian Villanueva (.235) was the only Tennessee player to reach base when he drew an eighth-inning walk with one out.
  • LHP Jeff Lorick (3.90) struck out four while tossing 2.2 scoreless innings of relief.
  • The no-hitter was the first thrown against Tennessee since Sept. 7, 2007, when the Smokies played the Huntsville Stars during postseason play. It was also the first regular season no-hitter against the Smokies since May 22, 2002.
  • Santiago’s no-no was the first nine-inning no-hitter thrown by a Lookouts pitcher since Travis Buckley accomplished the feat on June 1, 1996.

Kane County Cougars (44-22)
1st Place (+3.0)

The Cougars set a single-season franchise record for total regular season wins with a 3-2 victory over host Cedar Rapids. Kane County’s 89 victories this season lead both Major League and Minor League Baseball.

  • LHP Tyler Ihrig gave up one earned run over six innings to pick up the win.
  • 3B Jeimer Candelario (.256) went 2-for-4 with a run scored.
  • DH Cael Brockmeyer (.301) went 2-for-3 with a walk and two doubles (14).
  • RHP Jasvir Rakkar (0.49) allowed a run in 1.1 innings of relief to earn his first save of the year.

Boise Hawks (17-17)
3rd Place (-5.0)

Visiting Everett scored five runs in the 10th inning to beat Boise, 13-8. The four-hour, 19-minute game was the longest at Memorial Stadium since 2004.

  • C Daniel Canela (.288) went 3-for-4 with a walk and two runs scored.
  • 1B Alex Tomasovich (.316) went 3-for-5 with a double (6) and three RBI (18). He has seven RBI over his last two games.
  • SS Gleyber Torres (.417) went 4-for-5 with a triple (2) in just his third game with Boise this season.

Mesa Cubs (9-18)
5th Place (-10.0)

The Athletics scored four runs in the bottom of the first inning to beat visiting Mesa, 6-3.

  • SS Varonex Cuevas (.325) went 2-for-4 with a first-inning, solo home run.
  • CF Kevonte Mitchell (.293) went 2-for-4 with a run scored, a double (2) and two stolen bases (19).
  • RHP Jeferson Mejia (2.48) struck out five while allowing a run over 4.1 innings of relief.

Now Playing: Jake Arrieta, Evolution of an Ace

Jake Arrieta has been in this position before. Call it being the ace of the pitching staff. Call it being the Opening Day starter. Call it being the team leader. He was all that a couple of years ago with the Baltimore Orioles. And he’s all that again now with the Chicago Cubs.

A lot has happened in the intervening time, of course, including a trade from Baltimore to Chicago and some time in the minor leagues, as Arrieta attempted to add a little more polish and command to his outstanding pure stuff. It’s all led to a dramatic career renaissance that once again has Arrieta acting as the No. 1 starter on a big league pitching staff.

We sat down with Arrieta to talk about his career path and what’s changed this season. Pick up the September issue of Vine Line for the full cover story on Arrieta’s development.

Cubs recall OF Soler, IF Watkins from Iowa

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Jorge Soler will make his first major league start Wednesday. (Photo by Stephen Green)

The Cubs recalled outfielder Jorge Soler and infielder Logan Watkins from Triple-A Iowa Wednesday afternoon, placing outfielders Justin Ruggiano and Ryan Sweeney on the 15-day disabled list with left ankle inflammation and a left hamstring strain, respectively.

Soler, 22, was the organization’s No. 5 preseason prospect, according to Baseball America and ranked the No. 49 prospect in all of baseball prior to the season. The right-handed batter and thrower combined to hit .340/.432/.700 (AVG/OBP/SLG) with 23 doubles, 15 home runs and 57 RBI in 200 at-bats over 62 games this season across three minor league levels.

The 6-foot-4, 215-pound player started the 2014 season at Double-A Tennessee, where, despite being slowed by hamstring injuries, he batted .415/.494/.862 in 65 at-bats over 22 games to earn a promotion to Triple-A Iowa on July 24. In just more than a month with Iowa, Soler batted .282/.378/.618 with eight homers and 29 RBI in 32 games.

Soler originally signed a nine-year major league deal with the Cubs in June of 2012 out of Cuba. He entered the 2013 campaign ranked by Baseball America as the No. 3 prospect in the organization and batted .281 (59-for-210) with 13 doubles, eight homers and 35 RBI after being limited to 55 games with Single-A Daytona due to a left shin fracture. He was named to the World Team in the Futures Game that year (though he did not play due to injury) and recovered to participate in the Arizona Fall League with the Mesa Solar Sox, playing in 20 games.

Overall in 151 career minor league games, Soler has batted .307 (167-for-544) with 300 total bases, 108 runs scored, 43 doubles, three triples, 28 home runs, 117 RBI, a .383 on-base percentage, a .551 slugging percentage and a .934 OPS.

Watkins, who turns 25 on Friday, returns to the Cubs for his second stint this season. He hit .300 (3-for-10) with a double and three RBI in four games with the Cubs last week before being optioned back to Iowa after the game on Sunday. At Triple-A this season, he is batting .256 (83-for-324) with 21 doubles, four home runs and 38 RBI in 103 games. He was the organization’s 2012 Minor League Player of the Year.

Ruggiano, 32, is batting .281 (63-for-224) with 13 doubles, six home runs and 28 RBI in 81 games with the Cubs this season.

Sweeney, 29, is batting .251 (52-for-207) with nine doubles, three home runs and 20 RBI in 77 games.

Cubs Minor League Recap: 8/26/14

Daytona battled back to secure a win, and Kane County set a franchise mark with its 88th victory Tuesday. The other four teams were in action, but each lost. Here are some highlights from yesterday’s minor league games:

Iowa Cubs (69-70)
3rd Place (-4.0)

Iowa allowed five runs on 13 hits in a 5-3 loss to their host, the Tacoma Rainiers.

  • LF Junior Lake (.318) finished 2-for-3 with two runs, a walk, a double (2), a homer, two RBI (6) and a stolen base from the leadoff spot. His two hits extended his hitting streak to eight games (.350/14-for-40).
  • 3B Kris Bryant (.301) singled Lake in to put Iowa on the board in the first. His 109 RBI on the season (51 with Iowa) rank third in the minor leagues.

Tennessee Smokies (32-33)
T-1st Place (–)

Tennessee dropped its sixth-straight contest, a 6-5 comeback loss to visiting Jacksonville, to fall into a tie for first place.

  • CF Albert Almora (.256) doubled (7) and tripled (2) in his second game with multiple extra-base hits in the last four.
  • Five Smokies doubled in yesterday’s contest—Almora, SS-2B Anthony Giansanti (.237, 6 2B), 1B Lars Anderson (.330, 10 2B), C Charles Cutler (.313, 13 2B) and RF Rubi Silva (.257, 13 2B).
  • RHP Blake Cooper (1.49, 5 H) and LHP Hunter Cervenka (3.90, 14 H) each recorded a hold before RHP Frank Batista (4-2, 1.70) allowed three runs (two earned) in the ninth, suffering his second blown save and second loss.

Daytona Cubs (38-26)
1st Place (+2.0)

The D-Cubs maintained their first-place lead with a comeback 6-5 win at Dunedin.

  • RF Bijan Rademacher (.281) recorded all three Cubs extra-base hits, homering for the second-straight night, knocking two doubles (21) and driving in one (53).
  • 3B Wes Darvill (.251) singled twice in his first multihit game since July 29 vs. Bradenton.
  • SS Marco Hernandez (.270) also tallied two singles and knocked in two (51).
  • RHP Stephen Perakslis (5-0, 4.03) earned his fifth win with 2.1 scoreless innings of relief.
  • Perakslis was followed by RHP Zack Godley (3.69), who allowed one run over 1.2 frames for his seventh save.

Kane County Cougars (43-21)
1st Place (+3.0)

The Cougars tied a franchise record with their 88th win of the season, a 6-1 victory over host Burlington.

  • RHP Duane Underwood pitched 5.1 innings, giving up one earned run, walking none and striking out four.
  • DH Chesny Young (.337) recorded the lone multihit game for the Cougars, which included his sixth double.
  • Each player in the Cougars’ starting nine recorded at least one hit. Five Cougars recorded a double—Young, 1B Jacob Rogers (.267, 26 2B), CF Trey Martin (.243, 15 2B), 3B Jeimer Candelario (.252, 18 2B) and LF Shawon Dunston (.272, 16 2B). Dunston drove in a team-high two runs (35).
  • LHP Michael Heesch (2.43) and RHP Michael Wagner (2.68) combined for 3.2 innings of scoreless relief, striking out a combined five Bees.

Boise Hawks (16-16)
3rd Place (-5.0)

Everett overcame a 2-1 deficit with a three-run ninth in Boise, topping the Hawks, 4-2.

  • DH Kevin Brown (.269) finished 2-for-4 with his second triple of the season and both Boise runs.
  • RHP Joshua Conway did not factor into the decision, throwing three perfect innings before exiting the game.
  • In relief, LHP Sam Wilson (5-1, 3.82) suffered the loss, recording three earned runs over two innings of work.
  • RHP Daniel Lewis (0.90) allowed three inherited runners to score, suffering his first blown save despite a line of one scoreless inning.

Mesa Cubs (8-16)
5th Place (-8.5)

Mesa scored first, but surrendered a two-run lead to lose at the AZL Dodgers, 8-3.

  • 2B Varonex Cuevas (.329) hit his third triple (3) in four games, adding a single and driving in one (5).
  • CF Kevonte Mitchell (.292) also recorded his third triple, scoring one of Mesa’s three runs.
  • RF Eloy Jimenez (.225, 3 SB) and SS Ho-young Son (.254, 12 SB) each stole a base despite both going hitless.

From the Pages of Vine Line: The Chicago Bears at Wrigley Field

Bears

The following can be found in the August issue of Vine Line.

Playing football at Wrigley Field always presented its fair share of challenges. First, there were the shorter-than-regulation end zones and the wooden boards covering the Cubs’ dugout entrances. Add in the tilted field, mercilessly beaten-up turf, tiny locker rooms and other quirks, and the gameday experience was far from perfect.

But that didn’t stop the Chicago Bears, one of the most storied franchises in football history, from calling the Friendly Confines home for a half century. Legendary players, from Dick Butkus to Mike Ditka to Gale Sayers, all graced the field, and the Bears brought the beloved stadium its most recent championship in 1963. If anything, the now-100-year-old ballpark’s quirks only added to the lore.

Of course, the substandard field conditions didn’t faze Butkus. The rough and rugged Hall of Fame linebacker said he enjoyed playing at Wrigley Field more than at Soldier Field, where the Bears moved on a permanent basis in 1971, during the latter stages of his career.
The Bears legend recalled an episode during his rookie season in which he was sitting in the crowded clubhouse awaiting instructions on the next day’s opponent, but couldn’t hear a word coach George Halas was saying.

“I don’t know what the deal was, but all the veterans would bring their dogs to practice and have them in the room there,” Butkus said. “The old man’s trying to talk, and the dogs are barking, and I’m thinking, ‘Jesus.’ One had a pit bull. [Ed O’Bradovich] had a Great Dane. But to me, that was the pros.”

Welcome to football at Wrigley Field. It might not have been the ideal situation, but it was never dull.

* * * *
Back when football was first played at Weeghman Park—as the stadium on Clark and Addison was known at the time—it wasn’t really done with the fans in mind. Getting spectators into the stadium was obviously a priority, but the new sport was primarily concerned with finding its footing in the muddy ground of expansionism. Football games were played at Weeghman simply because teams needed a venue, and the park’s owners felt it would be a good way to make a little extra cash. The stadium was sitting dormant for half the year anyway.

But the baseball-first facility presented a number of challenges when it came to laying out a 100-yard football pitch without risking player safety—especially after the renovation that added an outfield wall and reshaped the bleachers in 1937.

The field ran north and south from left field to behind home plate. The north end zone ended just 18 inches in front of the solid brick left-field wall, while the southeast corner of the south end zone extended into the first-base dugout. To even out the surface, the grounds crew filled the dugout steps with sand. This also meant that corner of the end zone was smaller than the regulation 10 yards.

These hazards might sound ridiculous given the way the modern game is played, but according to Cubs historian Ed Hartig, there were hardly gifted wide receivers, let alone fade routes leading players into the corners of the end zones, during that era.

“Back then, it was supposed to be a running game,” Hartig said. “You didn’t run to the back of the end zone to make a catch. This is a time when the goalposts were still on the goal line.”

* * * *
In the ballpark’s early football days, it mainly drew high school, military and semipro squads. Sometimes as many as four games per day were scheduled on the field. Starting in 1919, independent teams like the Hammond All-Star Football Club, which signed a six-game lease, wanted to test the sport’s popularity in the city.

With a roster that included players like Olympic great Jim Thorpe and Northwestern standout Paddy Driscoll, the Hammond squad managed to draw upward of 10,000 fans at some games that season. The potential of the new sport sparked the interest of a few more Chicago-based teams and quickly led the Decatur Staleys to the city’s North Side.

In 1920, former University of Illinois standout George Halas was put in charge of a company football team funded by food starch conglomerate owner A.E. Staley. In his inaugural season at the helm, Halas came up from Decatur to play a few neutral-site games and then led his Staleys to a de facto championship game at Cubs Park, where the team battled the Akron Steel to a 0-0 tie in front of 12,000 fans.
Halas believed the game might have an audience in Chicago, and, coincidentally, Staley was looking for an out.

“After a couple years, Mr. Staley said, ‘We’re a starch company. We’re not a sports team,’” Hartig said. “‘I can’t keep supporting [the team]. I will for one more year, if you can get an opportunity to find your own supporters.’”

With the temporary backing of Staley, Halas took the team from central Illinois to the big city in 1921 and quickly found a home—albeit one with a field that fell a few yards shy of regulation. Halas reached out to Cubs President and Treasurer Bill Veeck Sr. about using Cubs Park.
The two sides reached a handshake one-year agreement in just minutes. The Cubs received 15 percent of the gate (20 percent when the receipts exceeded $10,000) and the concessions, while the Staleys retained all rights to the game programs. According to the coach’s autobiography, Halas by Halas, the deal would remain unchanged for the remainder of the partnership.

“The deal they got at Wrigley in terms of concessions and that type of stuff was very, very favorable to the team,” Hartig said. “The Wrigleys weren’t looking to make a big amount of money off the Bears.”

In conjunction with the move, the team was renamed the Chicago Staleys. One year later, with the contractual obligation completed between Staley and Halas, the new owner changed the moniker to the Chicago Bears, noting that his football players were larger than the Cubs baseball players with whom they shared the stadium.

The Bears would call Wrigley Field home for the next 50 years, enjoying seven NFL titles, franchise-defining superstars and incredible individual performances. The field conditions were rarely pristine due to the team’s heavy practice load—the grass was usually gone so the team would paint the playing surface green—but some former players wouldn’t have had it any other way.

“Even though it was a baseball field, I just felt it was great playing there because that was the essence of being a pro,” said Butkus, who called Wrigley home from 1965-70. “A pro should be able to play at a prairie on the South Side if need be.”

Off the field, the locker rooms were also far from ideal. The Cubs clubhouse back then was a smaller version of the cramped quarters the North Siders call home today. But imagine that room with more people, bigger pads and larger human beings. Butkus joked the rooms were probably too small for a basketball team. Still, he believed it was a better situation than what the visiting teams had to deal with.

“I don’t think they were too happy with the field when they played here,” Butkus said. “I really don’t think the opposing team liked walking down from their locker room, with those screens there [and] with everybody yelling and throwing [stuff] at them.”
That’s home-field advantage at its Chicago best.

* * * *
Despite the stadium’s shortcomings, there was no shortage of great play on the field. One of the best individual performances in NFL history occurred at the Friendly Confines on Dec. 12, 1965, when Bears Hall of Fame running back Gale Sayers tied an NFL record with six touchdowns in a single game. All day long, he wove in and out of a hapless 49ers defense that had a difficult time keeping its footing in the heavy mud.

“It was my game, it’s as simple as that,” Sayers said. “I’ve always said, and I’ll continue to say, ‘God gave me a gift to go out there and run with the football,’ and that’s what I did. I probably could have scored 10 touchdowns that day, but, hey, the time ran out. It’s just a day that was a once-in-a-lifetime experience.”

Another notable performance on the Wrigley Field turf occurred in December 1963, when the Bears—led by quarterback Billy Wade and standout tight end Mike Ditka—wrapped up the NFL championship with a 14-10 win over the Giants. It marked the last time a Chicago team claimed a title at Wrigley Field.

Eventually, as the game grew, football became too big for the cozy confines of a baseball stadium. Attendance continued to soar, and the small ballpark was unable to expand to meet demand. In 1970, it was announced that the next fall’s season would be the last at the facility. While Wrigley Field generally held slightly less than 37,000 fans for baseball, the Bears drew at least 40,000 to each of their final 56 games there, a stretch that began on Dec. 16, 1962.

“There are a couple of reasons why they left,” Hartig explained. “The NFL wanted bigger stadiums, and the park just couldn’t do it. In addition, the NFL … got more into television coverage. They wanted cameras in the end zone, and there wasn’t really room for it [at Wrigley Field]. And the end zone was dangerous.”

On May 13, 1971, the Bears announced Soldier Field would become the organization’s new home. The bigger stadium held 52,000 fans—8,000 more than Wrigley held at capacity—and was much more prepared for the NFL’s massive growth. Despite the new venue, it wasn’t a hit with all the players.

“I really enjoyed playing [at Wrigley Field]. I thought it was better than going to Soldier Field the first couple years,” said Butkus, who spent three seasons at the Bears’ current home. “They put in the damn Astroturf, and in the locker room over there, you can see the beams holding up the stadium. It was ready to cave in at any moment, it looked like.”

The Bears have long had a reputation as a gritty, smashmouth football team. And while Soldier Field is packed with its own history, much of the dirt and grit that defined the organization’s early years first manifested at the corner of Clark and Addison.

“I enjoyed playing here at Wrigley Field,” Sayers said. “I’ve always said it was 50 yards wide and 100 yards long, and that’s all I needed.”

Cubs Minor League Recap: 8/25/14

Iowa pitching set a franchise record for shutouts in a win, Kane County got back on track, and Boise posted a shutout Monday. Tennessee and Daytona both lost, while Mesa had the day off. Here are some highlights from yesterday’s minor league action:

Iowa Cubs (69-69)
3rd Place (-3.0)

Iowa pitching set a franchise record with its league-best 14th shutout in an 8-0 win over host Tacoma.

  • RF Jorge Soler (.282) homered for the second time in as many games, a three-run shot in the third inning. Soler is 11-for-20 (.550) with 10 RBI over his five-game hitting streak, including 9-for-12 (.750) the last three games.
  • 1B Jonathan Mota (.248) went 2-for-3 with his second homer of the season and first since April 26.
  • DH Junior Lake (.293) singled twice and doubled (1) to extend his hitting streak to seven games (.324/12-for-37), dating back to his second game with Iowa on August 19.
  • RHP Alberto Cabrera (4-2, 3.39) provided 4.2 scoreless innings of relief for his fourth win.
  • Prior to the game, three 2014 Iowa Cubs were named to the All-PCL team: 2B Arismendy Alcantara, LHP Tsuyoshi Wada, and RHP Blake Parker.

Tennessee Smokies (32-32)
1st Place (+1.0)

Tennessee dropped its fifth-straight contest, a 2-1 home loss to Jacksonville.

  • RHP C.J. Edwards fanned eight over five innings, giving up one earned run.
  • LF Pin-Chieh Chen (.242) came off the bench to record the only Tennessee multihit game, his second such game in a row. Chen has hit safely in his last five games (.429/9-for-21).
  • SS Anthony Giansanti (.230) tallied his 16th RBI despite going hitless for the second-straight game. It was the third time he has knocked in a run in a hitless effort.
  • LHP Andrew McKirahan (0-3, 2.96) suffered his third loss, pitching two frames of relief and allowing the winning run.

Daytona Cubs (37-26)
1st Place (+2.0)

Daytona could not keep a five-game winning streak alive as the Cubs fell to host Dunedin, 8-7—after trailing 7-1 after five.

  • 2B Gioskar Amaya (.275) tied a season high with seven total bases, blasting a solo homer in the fourth, adding his third triple of the year and knocking in two (35).
  • LF Kyle Schwarber (.312) extended his hitting streak to 13 games (.440/22-for-50), going 1-for-4 with an RBI (28).
  • LF Bijan Rademacher (.276) led off the ninth with a solo shot, finishing 2-for-4 with two RBI (52).

Kane County Cougars (42-21)
1st Place (+3.0)

Kane County took the lead in the top of the seventh with back-to-back blasts from DH Yasiel Balaguert and RF Jeffrey Baez, topping Burlington 8-3 on the road.

  • Balaguert (.243) went 2-for-4 with two runs, a double (16) and two RBI (48). Baez (.276) finished with just the one hit, driving in his 14th run.
  • 3B Jeimer Candelario (.252) tallied three singles in his fourth multihit effort in the last six games.
  • 1B Jacob Rogers (.266) went 2-for-4 with his team-leading 25th double and two RBI (67).
  • RHP James Pugliese (4-0, 1.81) allowed an unearned run in the sixth, suffering a blown save (2) but earning his fourth win when the Cougars went ahead in the seventh.
  • RHP Jasvir Rakkar (0.00) earned his first hold and extended his scoreless streak to 17.0 innings in 10 outings.
  • Prior to the game, Cougars Manager Mark Johnson was named the 2014 Midwest League Manager of the Year.

Boise Hawks (16-15)
3rd Place (-5.0)

Boise shut out visiting Everett, winning 3-0 despite being outhit by the AquaSox, 8-5.

  • RHP Trevor Clifton earned the win in his fourth quality start, delivering a season-high seven scoreless innings.
  • The shutout was completed by RHP Ryan McNeil (9.64), who earned his first hold, and RHP Corbin Hoffner (1.35), who recorded the final four outs for his second save.
  • 3B Jesse Hodges (.263) singled and doubled (11) for the only Boise multihit game. Four of the five Hawks hits were doubles—from Hodges, CF Rashad Crawford (.266, 12 2B), 1B Danny Canela (.282, 15 2B) and C Mark Malave (.273, 7 2B).

Cubs Minor League Recap: 8/24/14

It was a tough day for the Cubs’ affiliates, with only Daytona coming away victorious on Sunday. Boise had the day off and will resume play Monday night. Here are some highlights from yesterday’s minor league action:

Iowa Cubs (68-69)
3rd Place (-4.0)

Iowa lost for the ninth time in its last 10 games, falling at Tacoma, 5-4 in 14 innings.

  • RHP Dallas Beeler pitched six strong innings, giving up no earned runs and fanning six.
  • 3B Kris Bryant (.307) homered for the second-straight game, going 1-for-6 with a first-inning, two-run blast. His 43 total home runs on the season lead the minor leagues.
  • DH Jorge Soler (.278) reached base five times, going 3-for-5 with two walks and a seventh-inning, solo home run. He’s tallied eight hits in his last two games to go along with four RBI.
  • C Rafael Lopez (.286) and 1B Eli Whiteside (.202) recorded three hits apiece.

Tennessee Smokies (32-31)
1st Place (+1.0)

Tennessee lost its fourth-straight game, falling to visiting Jacksonville, 9-7. Tennessee pitching has allowed 50 runs in its last four games.

  • SS Addison Russell (.297) went 2-for-5 with a ninth-inning, two-run blast.
  • RF Pin-Chieh Chen (.233) went 4-for-5 with three runs scored, a double (7) and one stolen base (5).
  • 1B Lars Anderson (.347) went 3-for-5 with his 12th RBI of the season.
  • In his first start with the Smokies, Felix Doubront allowed four runs (three earned) on five hits in 4.1 innings. He threw 95 pitches, with 59 of them going for strikes.

Daytona Cubs (37-25)
1st Place (+2.5)

Daytona won its fifth-straight game, beating host Lakeland, 7-1.

  • RHP Tayler Scott gave up one earned run over five innings.
  • LF Kyle Schwarber (.314) extended his hitting streak to 12 games (.456/21-for-46) and homered for the fifth-straight game, going 2-for-4 with two home runs and three RBI (27). He’s clubbed six home runs over the last five games, and has recorded eight multihit efforts during his 12-game hit streak.
  • RF Billy McKinney (.308) went 2-for-3 with a walk, two runs scored and his 12th double of the year.
  • LHP Gerardo Concepcion (1.29) struck out three hitters in 2.1 scoreless innings of relief.

Kane County Cougars (41-21)
1st Place (+2.0)

Kane County had its 13-game winning streak snapped, falling at Burlington, 2-1.

  • RHP Daury Torrez gave up two unearned runs and struck out five in five innings.
  • SS Carlos Penalver (.214) went 2-for-4 with a double (17) and his 37th RBI of the campaign.
  • C Mark Zagunis (.292) went 1-for-3 with a walk and his first triple of the season.
  • RHP David Garner (3.38) allowed two hits and fanned one in three scoreless innings of relief.

Mesa Cubs (8-15)
5th Place (-7.5)

Mesa managed just two hits in a 5-1 loss at the AZL Angels.

  • 2B Varonex Cuevas (.319) and C Tyler Alamo (.205) recorded the two hits.
  • RHP Adbert Alzolay (2-4, 7.71) allowed one run and fanned three in two innings of work to suffer his fourth loss of the year.
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