Results tagged ‘ Wrigley Field ’

Cubs, Giants set to resume Tuesday’s suspended game Thursday afternoon

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As announced today by Major League Baseball, the Tuesday, August 19, game against the San Francisco Giants is scheduled to resume tomorrow at Wrigley Field.  The game will resume at 4:05 p.m. CT with the Cubs batting in the bottom of the 5th inning.  Following the conclusion of the game, the Cubs and Giants will play their regularly-scheduled game at 7:05 p.m.

Ticket holders from the Tuesday, August 19, game may redeem their tickets for tomorrow’s 4:05 p.m. game and remain for the regularly-scheduled 7:05 p.m. contest against the Giants.  Ticket holders for tomorrow’s 7:05 p.m. game may also attend the 4:05 p.m. game from their ticketed seats.

To redeem tickets, fans must present the Tuesday, August 19, game ticket at the Wrigley Field Ticket Office. Tickets may be redeemed for the best comparable seats and are subject to availability. They cannot be refunded or exchanged for cash value.

Tuesday, August 19, ticket holders who cannot make tomorrow’s  game may opt for a complimentary weeknight game at Wrigley Field during the remainder of the 2014 season as announced today by the team.

1990s Homestand Promotions and Guests: 8/19/14-8/24/14

Wrigley Field Tote Bag
This Wrigley Field 100 tote will be given to the first 10,000 fans on Saturday, Aug. 23.

The 1990s marked the arrival of Sammy Sosa, a stretch of continued excellence by Mark Grace, a dazzling performance by Kerry Wood and a Wild Card Tiebreaker win for the ages. Starting Tuesday, Aug. 19, the Cubs welcome the San Francisco Giants and Baltimore Orioles to town for a 1990s-themed celebration. Fans can relive the decade along with Chris Chelios, Gary Sinise and many more.

Here are the other guests and promotions you’ll find at the Friendly Confines during the six-game set.

1990s Homestand Recap, August 19-24

Tuesday, August 19, Chicago Cubs vs. San Francisco Giants, 7:05 p.m.

  • Promotion: Cubs Floppy Hat presented by Pepsi and Jewel-Osco (first 10,000 fans)
  • First pitch: Members of the WNBA Chicago Sky basketball team
  • Seventh-inning stretch: Wayne Messmer, longtime Cubs national anthem singer
  • Broadcast: CSN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, WRTO 1200-AM Spanish Radio, Cubs.com

Wednesday, August 20, Chicago Cubs vs. San Francisco Giants, 7:05 p.m.

  • Special Event: Star Wars Night
  • First pitch: Mark Duplass, actor from The League and The Mindy Project
  • Seventh-inning stretch: Chris Chelios, former Blackhawks player
  • Broadcast: WCIU-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, WRTO 1200-AM Spanish Radio, Cubs.com

Thursday, August 21, Chicago Cubs vs. San Francisco Giants, 7:05 p.m.

  • Special Event: Social Media Night
  • First pitch: Social Media Night winner
  • Seventh-inning stretch: TBD
  • Broadcast: CSN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, Cubs.com

Friday, August 22, Chicago Cubs vs. Baltimore Orioles, 1:20 p.m.

  • Promotion: Kerry Wood 20-Strikeout Bobblehead presented by Budweiser (first 10,000 adults 21+)
  • Seventh-inning stretch: Gary Sinise, actor, producer and director
  • Broadcast: WGN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, Cubs.com

Saturday, August 23, Chicago Cubs vs. Baltimore Orioles, 1:20 p.m.

  • Promotion: Wrigley Field Tote Bag presented by Starwood Preferred Guest (first 10,000 fans)
  • First pitch and Seventh-inning stretch: John Groce, Fighting Illini basketball coach; Members of the band O.A.R.
  • Broadcast: CSN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, Cubs.com

Sunday, August 24, Chicago Cubs vs. Baltimore Orioles, 1:20 p.m.

  • Throwback uniforms: Retro 1994 alternate uniform
  • Promotion: ’90s Throwback Gracie the Swan Beanie Baby (first 5,000 children)
  • First pitch: TBD
  • Seventh-inning stretch: TBD
  • Broadcast: WGN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, Cubs.com

For more information on Wrigley Field’s 100th birthday celebration, please visit wrigleyfield100.com.

 

Wrigley and the Cubs set to celebrate the 1990s

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Mark Grace led the 1990s in both hits and doubles. (Getty Images)

The 1990s at Wrigley Field featured some of the most memorable moments in franchise history. Mark Grace was a hit machine, Sammy Sosa bashed his way into MLB history, and the young Kerry Wood made his heralded rookie debut during the decade. The Cubs will celebrate the 1990s at Wrigley Field when they host a six-game homestand against the Giants and Orioles from August 19-24. The team’s throwback uniform, promotional giveaways, specialty concessions and entertainment will all mirror the sights and sounds of the 1990s as part of the season-long celebration of the ballpark’s 100th birthday.

The Cubs’ promotional schedule includes four giveaway items: a Cubs Floppy Hat, a Kerry Wood 20-Strikeout Bobblehead, a Wrigley Field Tote Bag and a ’90s Throwback Gracie the Swan Beanie Baby. The team will host two special events, offering fans a chance to attend a game with others who share the same interests along with an exclusive promotional item and fan experience. This homestand, the Cubs will host the team’s first ever Star Wars Night on Wednesday, Aug. 20, and their annual Social Media Night on Thursday, Aug. 21.

To help Wrigley Field continue its season-long centennial celebration, rock band O.A.R. will perform an Extra Innings Show as part of a free music event presented by Budweiser. The event will take place Saturday, Aug. 23, from 11 a.m.-8 p.m. in the Red and Purple Lots on the west side of Wrigley Field. O.A.R. will take the stage for a 90-minute postgame set immediately following the conclusion of the Cubs’ afternoon game against the Orioles. Other live entertainment will be available throughout the day. Vienna Beef hot dogs, snacks and Anheuser-Busch products, as well as O.A.R. merchandise, will be available for purchase during the event.

Special Event tickets for Star Wars Night and Social Media Night can be purchased at cubs.com/specialevents.

Throwback Uniforms:
On Sunday, Aug. 24, the Cubs will wear a popular throwback alternate uniform from 1994 with “Cubs” written in red script across the front of the jersey. The visiting Orioles will wear a throwback road uniform from 1994 as well.

Promotional Giveaways:
Fans coming to the ballpark will have the chance to collect promotional items throughout the homestand, beginning with a Cubs Floppy Hat, for the first 10,000 fans Tuesday, Aug. 19. On Friday, Aug. 22, the first 10,000 adults 21-and-over will receive a Kerry Wood 20-strikeout Bobblehead. On Saturday, Aug. 23, the first 10,000 fans will receive a Wrigley Field Tote Bag. On Sunday, Aug. 24, the first 5,000 children 13-and-under will receive a ’90s Throwback Gracie the Swan Beanie Baby.

Special Events:
The Cubs will host their first-ever Star Wars Night on Wednesday, Aug. 20. Fans can enjoy a night of baseball and intergalactic fun in the Budweiser Bleachers, Terrace Reserved Outfield or Upper Deck Box Outfield. Every ticket holder for this special event will receive an exclusive Jedi Rizzo bobblehead, with a portion of proceeds going to the Anthony Rizzo Family Foundation.

On Thursday, Aug. 21, Social Media Night attendees will receive an exclusive #WrigleyField100 shirt and access to an interactive pregame filming of Comcast SportsNet’s Sports Talk Live at Wrigley Field’s Captain Morgan Club. One attendee will be selected to throw a first pitch before the night’s game (must be present for the drawing). Other exciting prizes, such as game-used and autographed memorabilia, merchandise and gift cards, will be available throughout the evening.

Additionally, during the night’s game, the team will rely exclusively on fan-generated images from selected Social Media Night attendees to populate the club’s social media channels, including photos and videos of the evening’s ceremonial first pitches, the seventh-inning stretch from the broadcast booth and other in-game content. Beginning Aug. 21 and continuing throughout the season, fans can submit images to a dedicated social@cubs.com email account or by using the #CubsSocial hashtag for publishing consideration on Cubs social media accounts. Fans submitting images via email can include their social media profiles in the note to receive a photo credit in the post.

Specialty Food Offerings:
Levy Restaurants continues its decade-inspired menu at the Decade Diner, located inside Gate D near Section 142. The 1990s homestand features Kraft beef tacos with rice and beans. The tacos are made with seasoned ground beef topped with shredded lettuce, tomatoes, shredded Kraft Cheese and sour cream. Fans can also try the Salmon Burger, which is a house made salmon burger on a toasted sesame bun served with avocado, candied red onion and herb aioli.

The Decade Dogs stand near Section 123 is serving the 1990s Bagel Dog—a Vienna Beef hot dog wrapped in a warm bagel with deli mustard.

Adults 21-and-over can enjoy a Home Run Hop. This Dominican-inspired cocktail is made with island flavors, including Captain Morgan Spiced Rum, Meyers Silver Rum, pineapple juice and coconut water.

Historic Moments:
Wrigley Field witnessed several noteworthy events in the 1990s, including Kerry Wood’s 20-strikeout game, the unveiling of the Harry Caray statue and the addition of Jack Brickhouse’s “Hey, Hey” to the Wrigley Field foul poles.

On July 9, 1990, Ryne Sandberg won the Home Run Derby on a warm summer night at Wrigley Field. The next day, Wrigley Field hosted the All-Star Game for the third time as the American League defeated the National League, 2-0. That same year, after Greg Maddux had gone 13 starts without a win, manager Don Zimmer promised to swim across Lake Michigan if Maddux won his next game at Wrigley Field. Maddux delivered with a 4-2 victory over the Padres.

Though Zimmer showed up to the postgame news conference in a life jacket and sunglasses, he declined to make the 60-mile swim, claiming he “swims like a rock.”

On Opening Day in 1994, Karl “Tuffy” Rhodes hit home runs in three consecutive at-bats off the Mets’ Doc Gooden to become just the second player in major league history to hit three home runs on Opening Day.

On April 7, 1994, Michael Jordan made his Chicago baseball debut, playing for the White Sox and going 2-for-4 with two RBI in the Windy City Classic. The exhibition game ended in a 4-4 tie after 10 innings.

In 1997, Juniper bushes were added to the center field batter’s eye, replacing several rows of empty, deteriorating bleachers.

On May 6, 1998, in one of the most dominant pitching performances in big league history, 20-year-old Kerry Wood struck out 20 batters to tie a record and beat the Astros, 2-0, in his fifth start. Wood allowed just one hit—an infield single. That year, Wood earned the National League Rookie of the Year Award.

On June 5, 1998, the Cubs and White Sox played their first Interleague game at Wrigley Field. The Cubs won on a Brant Brown home run in extra innings and completed a sweep of the Sox two days later.

On June 30, 1998, Sammy Sosa hit his 20th home run of June against the Arizona Diamondbacks, earning Player of the Month honors and setting a major league record for home runs in a month.

In 1998, Sammy Sosa and Mark McGwire staged a memorable home run chase, culminating with Sosa earning the National League Most Valuable Player Award.

On Sept. 28, 1998, the Cubs went head to head with the San Francisco Giants in a Wild Card Tiebreaker Game. Steve Trachsel pitched a no-hitter into the seventh inning, and the Cubs beat the Giants 5-3 to claim the National League Wild Card spot on a Gary Gaetti home run.

On April 12, 1999, the Cubs unveiled a statue of Harry Caray at the corner of Sheffield and Addison and added Jack Brickhouse’s iconic “Hey, Hey” to the Wrigley Field foul poles.

Finally, On Sept. 25, 1999, the Cubs honored their All-Century team before a matchup against the Pirates. Twenty players and one manager were elected by fan balloting. That same year, Mark Grace went 2-for-4 in the final home game of 1999, finishing the decade as the major league leader in hits (1,754) and doubles (364).

To learn more about these historic moments and others, visit wrigleyfield100.com. General tickets for the Giants and Orioles series remain available at cubs.com or 800-THE-CUBS (800-843-2827).

O.A.R. to perform a free show at Wrigley Field

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O.A.R. performing during the 2006 MLB All-Star Game. (Jamie Squire/Getty Images)

To help Wrigley Field continue its season-long centennial celebration, the Cubs will host rock band O.A.R. for a postgame Extra Innings Show on Saturday, Aug. 23.

The free show will take place from 11 a.m.-8 p.m. in the Red and Purple Lots due west of Wrigley Field, with O.A.R. taking the stage immediately following the end of the Cubs’ afternoon matchup with the Orioles.

This summer, O.A.R released their eighth studio album, The Rockville LP, and recently played at the 2014 All-Star game in Minneapolis. They are known for hits including “Love and Memories,” “Lay Down” and a Friendly Confines favorite, “This Town,” a track played as the Cubs are introduced before every home game this season.

Fans will also have the chance to enjoy live entertainment starting at 11 a.m. until the beginning of the game, and after O.A.R.’s postgame set.

Available for purchase during the performance will be ballpark food and beverage options, including Vienna Beef hot dogs, snacks and Anheuser-Busch products, as well as O.A.R. merchandise.

The event is free to the general public and limited to a first-come, first-served basis. For more information, please visit cubs.com.

1980s Homestand Promotions and Guests: 8/8/14-8/14/14

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The first night game at Wrigley Field on Aug. 8, 1988. (Photo by Stephen Green)

The 1980s brought Ryno, Dawson, the Boys of Zim and the first night game at historic Wrigley Field. Starting Friday, Aug. 8, the Cubs welcome the Tampa Bay Rays and Milwaukee Brewers to town for a 1980s-themed celebration. Fans can relive the decade along with Jody Davis, Bill Bonham, Fergie Jenkins and many more.

Here are the other guests and promotions you’ll find at the Friendly Confines during the seven-game set.

1980s Homestand Recap, August 8-14

Friday, Aug. 8, Chicago Cubs vs. Tampa Bay Rays, 3:05 p.m.

  • Promotion: First Night Game Bobblehead presented by Las Vegas (first 10,000 fans)
  • First pitch and seventh-inning stretch: Jody Davis, former Cubs catcher
  • Broadcast: WGN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, Cubs.com

Saturday, Aug. 9, Chicago Cubs vs. Tampa Bay Rays, 3:05 p.m.

  • Promotion: Cubs Retro Headphones presented by Athletico (first 10,000 fans)
  • First pitch and seventh-inning stretch: Digger Phelps, former Notre Dame men’s basketball coach and retired ESPN college basketball analyst
  • Broadcast: WGN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, Cubs.com

Sunday, Aug. 10, Chicago Cubs vs. Tampa Bay Rays, 1:20 p.m.

  • Promotion: ‘80s Throwback Cubs Rubik’s Cube presented by Comcast SportsNet (first 5,000 kids 13-and-under)
  • First pitch: Bill Bonham, former Cubs pitcher
  • Seventh-inning stretch: TBD
  • Broadcast: CSN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, Cubs.com

Monday, Aug. 11, Chicago Cubs vs. Milwaukee Brewers, 7:05 p.m.

  • First pitch and seventh-inning stretch: Fergie Jenkins, Hall of Fame Cubs pitcher
  • Broadcast: CSN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, WRTO 1200-AM Spanish Radio, Cubs.com

Tuesday, Aug. 12, Chicago Cubs vs. Milwaukee Brewers, 7:05 p.m.

  • Special Event: Cubs Scout Night
  • First pitch: Willy Roy, two-time champion Chicago Sting coach
  • Seventh-inning stretch: Members of the Chicago Sting 1981 championship team
  • Military recognition: U.S. Navy Leap Frogs
  • Broadcast: CSN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, WRTO 1200-AM Spanish Radio, Cubs.com

Wednesday, Aug. 13, Chicago Cubs vs. Milwaukee Brewers, 7:05 p.m.

  • Throwback uniforms: Retro 1988 home uniform
  • Special Event: ‘80s Rock Night/Zubazpalooza 2
  • First pitch and seventh-inning stretch: Steve Trout, former Cubs pitcher
  • Broadcast: CSN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, Cubs.com

Thursday, Aug. 14, Chicago Cubs vs. Milwaukee Brewers, 1:20 p.m.

  • Promotion: Cubs Fathead presented by Pepsi (first 10,000 fans)
  • First pitches: Miss Illinois, Marisa Buchheit, and actor Joel Murray
  • Seventh-inning stretch: Joel Murray, actor
  • Broadcast: WGN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, Cubs.com

For more information on Wrigley Field’s 100th birthday celebration, please visit www.wrigleyfield100.com.

 

Hot Off the Presses: August Vine Line featuring Anthony Rizzo

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Last month, the Cubs kicked off the annual trade deadline frenzy with some big Fourth of July fireworks, sending starting pitchers Jeff Samardzija and Jason Hammel to the Oakland Athletics for infielder Addison Russell, outfielder Billy McKinney, right-handed pitcher Dan Straily and a player to be named later.

In some ways, the trade was difficult for Cubs fans to stomach, as they lost two of the top pitchers from a team that was suddenly looking, dare I say, formidable. But it might also be the move that finally puts the team over the hump and on the path to sustained excellence at the big league level.

In exchange for a right-hander who was only under contract through 2014 (Hammel) and another under contract through 2015 and seemingly eager to test the free agent waters (Samardzija), the Cubs received the A’s top two prospects, including one of the best in the game, and an arm that could see time in the big league rotation this season.

No one likes trading proven talent, especially a longtime Cub like Samardzija. President of Baseball Operations Theo Epstein made it clear several times in his press conference following the blockbuster deal how hard it was to part ways with the Shark.

“Nothing would make us happier than being in the position Oakland is in, which is to aggressively add to the big league team and enhance the team’s chances of making the postseason and winning the World Series,” Epstein said. “Being sellers is not what we want to do, so if we’re going to do it, we need to make it count. And we need to get a player back who significantly impacts the organization, helps change the landscape, helps make our future a heck of a lot better.”

In the past, Epstein has said there are two great currencies in baseball: deep reserves of young talent and massive amounts of payroll flexibility. The Cubs now have both.

Admittedly, most of this talent is still percolating in the minor leagues, but it’s coming fast. A year ago, it was the Big Three: Albert Almora, Javier Baez and Jorge Soler. This year—thanks to strong trades, draft picks and development—the Cubs have a Magnificent Seven of gifted hitters, with Arismendy Alcantara, Kris Bryant, Russell and Kyle Schwarber added to that mix.

Since the end of the steroid era, the big league pendulum has swung back toward pitching dominance, and hitting is becoming a rarer commodity. In other words, the Cubs are stockpiling the most precious resource in baseball—and they’ve got more of it than almost anyone else. With this trade, the organization now owns the No. 2 (Bryant), No. 5 (Russell) and No. 7 (Baez) prospects in the game, as ranked in the Baseball America midseason top 50.

Let me repeat that—the Cubs now have three of the top seven prospects in the game—and Baez is making his big league debut tonight in Colorado. Of course, prospects have a nasty habit of not always panning out as expected. But it’s important to remember all of these minor leaguers are essentially funneling into eight everyday major league spots. Two of those spots are already filled by 2014 All-Stars Starlin Castro and Anthony Rizzo, while Alcantara and Baez are auditioning for two more.

This month, we look at cornerstone major leaguer Rizzo, who is having a terrific season on both sides of the ball and has taken a huge developmental step forward this year. We also say goodbye to Don Zimmer, a man who left an indelible mark on Cubs—and baseball—history over his 66 years in the dugout. Finally, we move off the diamond to the gridiron to remember what the Chicago Bears accomplished in their 50 years at the Friendly Confines, including Wrigley Field’s most recent championship in 1963.

To keep track of Cubs history—including history in the making—subscribe to Vine Line today and follow us on Twitter at @cubsvineline. With the way things are coming together for the team, the next championship season may not be far off.

—Gary Cohen

Now Playing: Keeping Score with Lennie Merullo, the oldest living Cub

Despite hailing from the Boston area, Lennie Merullo is a Cub through and through. The spry, 97-year-old former shortstop is the last surviving link to the team’s most recent World Series appearance in 1945 and is the oldest living Cub. After his seven-year playing career ended, Merullo remained with the organization for decades as a scout and said he truly bleeds Cubbie blue. He still watches every game, and his house is filled with memorabilia from his years on the North Side.

Vine Line caught up with Merullo when was honored at the park in early June. To read the complete interview, pick up the August issue.

From the Pages of Vine Line: Our July Q&A with Ernie Banks and Derek Jeter

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(Photo courtesy New York Yankees)

Mr. Cub and Mr. November. When it comes to playing shortstop in the major leagues, it’s hard to do better than Cubs legend Ernie Banks and all-time Yankees great Derek Jeter.

Between them, they have 28 All-Star appearances, two MVP Awards (with 10 top-10 finishes) and six Gold Gloves. They have also amassed nearly 6,000 hits and 800 home runs. Banks was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977. Assuming Jeter holds firm on his decision to retire after this season, he just needs the calendar to turn to 2019 for his certain enshrinement.

Both enjoyed long and distinguished careers with one organization; both spawned memorable moments and were the faces of their respective franchises; and both became great ambassadors for the game.

When Derek Jeter made a rare interleague appearance in Chicago this past May, Vine Line and Yankees Magazine couldn’t let the opportunity to get the two iconic players together slip away.

Yankees Magazine Editor-in-Chief Alfred Santasiere III spoke to the man affectionately known as Mr. Cub and the Yankees captain about playing a demanding defensive position, spending their entire careers with a single team, playing at the Friendly Confines and more.

For baseball fans, it doesn’t get any better than this.

Vine Line: First of all, it’s an honor to be here with two of the greatest shortstops the game has ever seen. Thank you both. Mr. Jeter, how did Mr. Banks, who is over 6 feet tall, impact the future of the position?

Derek Jeter: I’ve had the opportunity to meet Phil Rizzuto and Pee Wee Reese, who were two of the other great shortstops from Mr. Banks’ era. Those guys epitomized who played that position back then—shorter guys without a lot of power. Mr. Banks redefined the position, and he really paved the way for taller players like me to get the opportunity to play shortstop.

Ernie Banks: Who were the shortstops you watched when you were growing up?

DJ: I was a big Cal Ripken Jr. fan. He’s 6 foot 4, and he played the position as well as anyone I had seen. I also liked watching Barry Larkin, who played his college ball in my home state of Michigan. Alan Trammell played for the Detroit Tigers, and they were on TV a lot in my house when I was growing up, so I got to see him play frequently.

EB: Why didn’t they ever move you to third base?

DJ: I don’t know. I’m still trying to figure that out.

VL: Mr. Banks, what are your thoughts on Mr. Jeter’s ability to play such a demanding position so well for nearly two decades?

EB: Well, he’s a remarkable player, and that’s proven by the fact that he is still playing shortstop. We all slow down a little as we get older. I moved to first base after about 10 seasons at shortstop. But Derek has done what no one else has, and that’s remarkable.

VL: How much does it mean to each of you to have played for one team your entire careers—and to be synonymous with those teams?

DJ: Playing my entire career in New York has always been important to me. I’ve been fortunate because in this day and age, it’s more difficult to stay with one team than when Mr. Banks was playing. With free agency, there is so much player movement, and teams get rid of players when there are younger players available who can play the same position a little better. But I can’t imagine playing anywhere else.

EB: It means the world to me. We played all day games in Chicago back then because they didn’t have lights at Wrigley Field until 1988. That was something I got used to and really enjoyed. The only night games we played were when we were on the road. Like Derek said, I couldn’t have imagined what it would have been like to play for another team. If I had played for another team and I had to play most of the games at night, it would have felt like every game was an away game for me.

VL: How would each of you describe your respective fan bases?

EB: The fans here are loyal. When I was playing, I got to meet a lot of fans, and that was a lot of fun. I signed autographs for as many kids as I could because I thought that one day I might be asking one of those kids for a job. Cubs fans aren’t as loud as Yankees fans though. The first time I met Derek, I asked him what it’s like playing in New York. He looked at me and said, “When you win, it’s loud.”

DJ: That’s a great story. Yankees fans follow the team closely, and there’s a lot of energy in Yankee Stadium every time we take the field. The expectation level is high, but there’s no better place to win than in New York.

VL: The enthusiasm that both of you have for the game is well documented. What makes playing baseball for a living so enjoyable?

DJ: Every day is a new day. It’s kind of like life in that you wake up and you never know what’s going to happen when you get to the ballpark. Regardless of how you played the day before, you come to the ballpark with a clean slate the next day. I like that about baseball. I have enjoyed competing and being around my teammates as well. That’s why I have played the game for as long as I have.

EB: It was fun being out there every day. That’s why I said, “It’s a great day for baseball. Let’s play two.” I especially enjoyed playing the shortstop position. For me, making adjustments to where I was going to play in the field depending on who was on the mound and who was at the plate was part of the game I relished. I got as much fun out of the strategy of the game and making sure I was in the right place to turn double plays as I got out of hitting the ball out of the park.

VL: Mr. Banks, what were the most challenging aspects of going directly from the Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro Leagues to the Cubs at a time when there were very few African-Americans in the majors?

EB: As far as being discriminated against, that’s all I knew since the time I was growing up. But the hardest thing about leaving the Monarchs for the Cubs was saying goodbye to my teammates in Kansas City. I liked being around those guys, and I didn’t want to leave them. They were like my family.

VL: How did you adjust to life in the big leagues?

EB: I played for [legendary Negro Leagues player and manager] Buck O’Neil in Kansas City, and I played alongside Gene Baker and Tony Taylor, who knew a lot about the game. I learned how to play the game from those guys. They taught me about the intricacies of the game and the shortstop position. That along with some God-given ability made it so I was prepared to play in the big leagues when I arrived in Chicago.

VL: Mr. Jeter, how was your career impacted by what Mr. Banks and others did in breaking the color barrier in the early 1950s?

DJ: It’s unimaginable for me. Mr. Banks is one of the players who paved the way for all African-Americans to play the game. I’m grateful to him for what he did on the field, and I also appreciate the way he has treated me since I was a young player.

VL: Mr. Banks, what stands out about Mr. Jeter’s accomplishments and the way he has represented himself and his team over the years?

EB: I really admire him. He’s accomplished so many great things. He’s knowledgeable about every aspect of playing the game. He studies the opposing pitchers, and he learned how to hit the ball to all fields at a young age. He’s an amazing young player. When he got his 3,000th hit on a home run, that was really special for me to watch. What was that like for you, Derek?

DJ: Well, I appreciate you referring to me as a young player. Hitting that home run felt great. More than anything, I was happy that it happened in front of our fans in New York.

EB: How did you do that?

DJ: I closed my eyes and swung the bat.

VL: Mr. Banks, what makes Wrigley Field such a special baseball destination?

EB: It’s special because it has been here for 100 years, and we’ve had some great teams. It’s a beautiful place, and so much history has taken place on this field. Babe Ruth stood a few feet from where we are sitting, pointed to the seats and then hit the ball out of the park. More than 80 years later, Derek Jeter will come up to the plate in the same place. That’s an amazing thing. Also, the fans are very close to the field, and that makes it an intimate setting for baseball. There’s no better place to watch a game.

VL: Mr. Jeter, how exciting is it to visit Wrigley Field in your final season—and during the stadium’s centennial?

DJ: I like being a part of history and tradition, and I’m thrilled to get one last chance to play here—especially since I was on the disabled list when we played here in 2011. I drove here with my class on my last day of high school, and that is a great memory. If I could have written a script for my career back then, I would have included a trip to Wrigley Field during my final season.

EB: You’re not really going to quit, are you?

DJ: After this season.

EB: You can’t do that.

DJ: Yes, I can.

EB: I wish guys like you never had to quit.

DJ: Well, let’s just say I’m moving on.

—Alfred Santasiere III

Now Playing: Stretching Out with Jeneane Lesko of the AAGPBL

Some say throwing a baseball “like a girl” is a bad thing; Jeneane Lesko begs to differ. Vine Line caught up with the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League president and former left-handed pitcher when the AAGPBL was being honored during the 1940s celebration at Wrigley Field in early June. It’s worth noting the 79-year-old southpaw toed the major league rubber for her ceremonial first pitch and fired a heater right into the catcher’s mitt.

To read the complete interview with Lesko, pick up the August issue of Vine Line.

1970s Homestand Promotions and Guests: 7/22/14-7/31/14

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Eddie Vedder and Pearl Jam playing at Wrigley Field in 2013. (Photo by Stephen Green)

Starting Tuesday, July 22, the Cubs welcome the Padres, Cardinals and Rockies to town for a 1970s-themed celebration at historic Wrigley Field. Fans can relive the decade of decadence along with Pearl Jam’s Eddie Vedder, Rick Sutcliffe, Pat Fitzgerald, ESPN’s Mike & Mike, and many more.

Here are the other guests and promotions you’ll find at the Friendly Confines during the 10-game set.

1970s Homestand Recap, July 22-31

Tuesday, July 22, Chicago Cubs vs. San Diego Padres, 7:05 p.m.

  • Promotion: Cubs Wine Tote presented by E&J Gallo Wine (first 10,000 adults 21+)
  • First pitch: Brad Guzan, USA World Cup team and Chicago native
  • Seventh-inning stretch: Mark Grant, San Diego Padres broadcaster and Chicago native
  • Broadcast: CSN+, WGN 720-AM Radio, WRTO 1200-AM Spanish Radio, Cubs.com

Wednesday, July 23, Chicago Cubs vs. San Diego Padres, 7:05 p.m.

  • First pitch and seventh-inning stretch: TBD
  • Broadcast: CSN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, Cubs.com

Thursday, July 24, Chicago Cubs vs. San Diego Padres, 7:05 p.m.

  • Promotion: Cubs T-shirt presented by StubHub (first 10,000 fans)
  • First pitches: Eddie Vedder of Pearl Jam and Harry Kane of English Premier League’s Tottenham Hotspur
  • Seventh-inning stretch: Eddie Vedder, Pearl Jam
  • Broadcast: WGN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, Cubs.com

Friday, July 25, Chicago Cubs vs. St. Louis Cardinals, 3:05 p.m.

  • Promotion: Jack Brickhouse Bobblehead with audio chip presented by Advocate Health Care (first 10,000 fans)
  • First pitch and seventh-inning stretch: Pat Brickhouse, widow of legendary broadcaster Jack Brickhouse
  • Broadcast: WGN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, Cubs.com

Saturday, July 26, Chicago Cubs vs. St. Louis Cardinals, 3:05 p.m.

  • Promotion: Ernie Banks Replica Statue presented by Budweiser (first 10,000 adults 21+)
  • First pitch and seventh-inning stretch: Rick Sutcliffe, former Cubs pitcher
  • Broadcast: CSN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, Cubs.com

Sunday, July 27, Chicago Cubs vs. St. Louis Cardinals, 1:20 p.m.

  • Throwback uniforms: Retro 1978 road uniform
  • Promotion: ’70s Throwback Cubs Magic Baseball presented by Gonnella Baking Co. (first 5,000 children)
  • First pitch and seventh-inning stretch: Pat Fitzgerald, Northwestern University Head Football Coach
  • Broadcast: WGN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, Cubs.com

Monday, July 28, Chicago Cubs vs. Colorado Rockies, 7:05 p.m.

  • Promotion: Northwestern Football Magnet Schedule
  • Special Event: Girl Scout Night
  • First pitch: NPR’s Scott Simon
  • Seventh-inning stretch: TBD
  • Broadcast: CSN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, WRTO 1200-AM Spanish Radio, Cubs.com

Tuesday, July 29, Chicago Cubs vs. Colorado Rockies, 7:05 p.m.

  • Promotion: Mobile Device Power Bank presented by The Private Bank (first 10,000 fans)
  • First pitch: ESPN’s Mike Greenberg and Mike Golic
  • Seventh-inning stretch: ESPN’s Colin Cowherd
  • Broadcast: WGN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, WRTO 1200-AM Spanish Radio, Cubs.com

Wednesday, July 30, Chicago Cubs vs. Colorado Rockies, 7:05 p.m.

  • Promotion: Cubs T-shirt presented by Benjamin Moore (first 10,000 fans)
  • First pitch: Pete LaCock, former Cubs first baseman/outfielder from the 1970s
  • Seventh-inning stretch: Bill Madlock, former Cubs third baseman from the 1970s
  • Broadcast: CSN+, WGN 720-AM Radio, Cubs.com

Thursday, July 31, Chicago Cubs vs. Colorado Rockies, 1:20 p.m.

  • Seventh-inning stretch: Fitz & The Tantrums
  • Broadcast: CSN-TV, WGN 720-AM Radio, Cubs.com

For more information on Wrigley Field’s 100th birthday celebration, please visit www.wrigleyfield100.com.

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